“My life needs editing.”

“My life needs editing.”

—Mort Sahl, Canadian-born American comedian and actor

Photo from Flickr by Matt Hampel

Photo from Flickr by Matt Hampel

Have you ever considered writing your autobiography?

If you did, how many people would lay down some cash to buy it? What if you handed out copies for free? How many people would spend the time to read it?

If your answers fall short of producing a best seller, perhaps your life—at least the life still ahead of you—could use a bit of editing.

EXERCISE:

Examine the lives of those you respect and admire as a place to begin writing and living the next chapter of your life. Make sure you use your most playful, adventurous, and creative thinking to build on and expand on the good things you see.

You can also do a bit of editing on the life you have already lived. One simple way to do this is to replace all setbacks and failures in the light of lessons learned.

Feel free to reply to the post with any thoughts and insights that come up for you.

“We all have the extraordinary …”

“We all have the extraordinary coded within us, waiting to be released.”

—Jean Houston, Ph.D., scholar, philosopher and researcher

Photo from Mayo Clinic

Photo from Mayo Clinic

The process of coaching is like being a geneticist. It begins with the fundamental belief in what Dr. Houston states.  Guided by an extensive inquiry, it evolves into a supportive partnership to decipher each person’s special code, and helps them express it in the world.

Consider the discovery of DNA, and the work of scientists sequencing the entire genome with the intention of supporting each individual in living the most extraordinary life possible.

EXERCISE:

How can you be a coach for others and have coaching partnerships supporting you to release and realize the wonders of everyone in your professional and personal communities?

“The heart should be cultivated with more assiduity than the head.”

“The heart should be cultivated with more assiduity than the head.”

– Noah Webster, lexicographer

Noah Webster registered the copyright on his American dictionary in the English language (A Compendious Dictionary of the English Language) over 185 years ago.

When I was young I was not such an avid reader. Words – especially words like assiduity – tripped me up, due to my lack of understanding and my impatience.

Both of my parents installed the discipline of taking time to learn the meaning of such words, much to my initial frustration. Today, I know it was the assiduity of their hearts that had me persist in this flagging effort, to help me learn and grow.

Exercise:

Imagine what life would be like if Webster had also created a dictionary of the heart. What other books and resources – such as the Bible, Torah, Koran, or works of literature – provide such heart-developing wisdom? Perhaps a dose of assiduity is called for here.