Friday Review of Uniqueness

FRIDAY REVIEW: UNIQUENESS

What does it really mean to be “unique”? Here are a few uniqueness-related posts you may have missed. Click the links to read the full messages.

 

“Do not wish to be anything but what you are, and try to be that perfectly.”

 

 

 

“Be who you are, say what you feel, because those who mind don’t matter, and those who matter don’t mind.”

 

 

 

“Do more of what makes you awesome.”

 

 

 

 

 

If you were to do nothing

“Think of the consequences if you were to do nothing.”

—Author Unknown

FOMO – the Fear of Missing Out – has many folks living in overdrive throughout their days. When asked by colleagues and friends how they are, they respond with words such as, busy, slammed, and crazy.

A common exercise I offer to my clients is to create a Time Log – to capture the reality of where their time is going. With this new awareness, they can reduce or stop certain activities completely, and regain a greater degree of control in their lives.

In the case of the seeming urgent but not important aspects of life, doing nothing has no real consequences. On the other hand, doing nothing on the important aspects that may also be urgent (or not) can have significant consequences.

EXERCISE:

Consider creating a Time Log or applying Steven Covey’s Time Matrix to the various aspects of your life.

we learn by taking action

“We learn by taking action and seeing whether it works or not.”

—Patrick Lencioni, Author of The Five Dysfunctions of a Team

Image from Unsplash by Rawpixel

In the book BOLD – How to Go Big, Create Wealth, and Impact the World, authors Peter Diamandis and Steven Kotler point out key strategies to achieve breakthrough results.

It seems that most innovative and pioneering organizations and people use a form of rapid experimentation and iterations to come up with amazing products and services. Those products and services eventually come into our lives just like a delivery from Amazon.

One example is the process Google X (or just “X”) uses to support their prolific product development. Their “Never Fail to Fail” innovation principles use this rapid iteration process to fail frequently, fail fast, and most importantly, fail forward.

EXERCISE:

How can you increase your level of action and experimentation to create far more innovative solutions to better your world?

Pick up a copy of BOLD to examine many other ideas to make a far bigger dent in your own universe.

A well-developed sense of humor

“A well-developed sense of humor is the pole that adds balance to your steps as you walk the tightrope of life.”

—William Arthur Ward, 20th Century Author of inspirational maxims

Image of Pope Francis in a crowd

Photo from Unsplash by Ashwin Vaswani

Are you a student of leadership?

If so, I highly suggest you watch the Netflix film, Pope Francis – A Man of His Word.

The film demonstrates a man who lives what he preaches and who has gained the trust of people across the world, from all religions, cultures, and social backgrounds.

His universal wisdom and message of hope provides views on many global questions and issues including social justice, immigration, ecology, wealth inequality, materialism, and the role of the family.

Toward the end of this film he suggests that each of us can participate in this global community effort by wearing a smile more often, and by developing a better sense of humor to add more balance to our lives.

EXERCISE:

Consider watching this important film with family and friends. Allow time after the viewing for discussion and dialogue to see how you can and will benefit from his universal message of hope.

Most Good Resolutions

“Most good resolutions start too late and end too soon.”

—Arnold Glasow, 20th Century American Humorist

Image of an empty gym

Image from Unsplash by Inspired Horizons Digital

The New Year’s resolution to be healthy and fit is beginning to hit a speed bump at my fitness club. During the first weeks of the year, the parking lot was full, there were lines for the showers, and far too many soiled towels on the floor.

At the same time, all sorts of treats, including cookies, cakes, and candy were popping up in the kitchen at work, as the new “Salad Warriors” eliminated them from their homes.

Discipline and self-restraint are now waning a bit, and far too many of us are giving in to the comfort foods and warm covers associated with winter.

EXERCISE:

What are the resolutions that you either started too late or ended too soon?

How might you incorporate a more rigorous accountability structure to tackle these priority areas once and for all?

Please consider reading or re-reading Steven Covey’s classic book, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People as one of your first steps in this process.

Friday Review of Posts on Thinking

FRIDAY REVIEW: THINKING

How often do you think about the way you (or others) think? Here are a few thinking-related posts you may have missed. Click the links to read the full messages.

 

“The ability to perceive or think differently is more important than the knowledge gained.”

 

 

 

“Great minds like a think.”

 

 

 

 

“If you see the world in black and white, you’re missing important grey matter.”

 

 

 

One aspect of a successful relationship

“One aspect of a successful relationship is not just how compatible you are, but how you deal with your incompatibility.”

—Daniel Goleman, Founder of the Emotional Intelligence Movement

Image of an older couple sitting on a bench overlooking the ocean

Image from Unsplash by James Hose Jr.

Did you know that in western cultures, over 90 percent of people marry? Healthy marriages are good for the couple, and for their children. Unfortunately, 40-50 percent of first marriages end in divorce, and the divorce rate for subsequent marriages is even higher.

During the courting/dating phase of a relationship, compatibility is a key element to the initial connection. Over time, partners begin seeing aspects of one another they were a bit blind to during the “show only your best side” phase.

Goleman and other experts on successful marriage point to numerous success factors – see the list below – that help marriage stand the test of time.

  • Respecting each other’s differences
  • Sharing common values
  • Open and honest communication
  • Being fair and respectful
  • Having a sense of humor
  • Demonstrating appreciation and gratitude
  • Honesty and integrity
  • Sensitivity, compassion, empathy
  • Seeing your marriage as a partnership and working as a team
  • Forgiveness for your partner and yourself

EXERCISE:

On this Valentine’s Day, consider having a discussion with your partner regarding this list. What efforts can and will you take to make your relationship more successful and fulfilling?

If there was only the ‘right’ way to do something, Fosbury would never have flopped

“If there was only the ‘right’ way to do something, Fosbury would never have flopped.”

—John Whitmore, 20th Century South African Surfer

Image of Fosbury doing the flop

image from itv

When was the last time you asked for directions?

When was the last time you asked more than one person for directions to the same destination?

With today’s technology, we check Google maps, Waze, or other tech tools to see what is recommended. What is the fastest route? The most scenic? Which has the fewest tolls?

What is the best, or in the case of today’s quote, the “right” way to go?

Where do right and wrong apply in your personal and professional communities? Where do you find yourself on the same page, or on the other side of decisions, resulting in friction or upset?

EXERCISE:

How and in what ways can and will you be far more open and accepting of other’s right to be right?

We remain young to the degree that our ambitions are greater than our memories

“We remain young to the degree that our ambitions are greater than our memories.”

Dan Sullivan, co-founder of Strategic Coach

Image from Humanlongevity.com

How long do you expect to live?

Dan Sullivan, the co-founder of Strategic Coach, expects to live 156 years. Over the years, he has had a voracious passion for longevity and optimal health. In the Exponential Wisdom Podcast, he and Peter Diamandis explore where the world is headed by discussing cutting edge technologies and global trends.

Exploring topics such as gene editing, stem cells, artificial intelligence, and nanotechnology, they look into the multi-disciplinary crystal ball of the future of health care. Peter Diamandis, founder of Human Longevity, Inc., expects to live 700 years. He is best known for his X-Prize Foundation and competition, and the commercialization of space. Sullivan and Diamandis encourage the rest of us to release the idea of traditional retirement. They council us to stay actively engaged in making our future ambitions far more extraordinary than our past.

EXERCISE:

Consider reading Peter’s book Abundance, or Dan’s book The Laws of Lifetime Growth, to help guide you to an even more extraordinary future.

Check out their podcast on this and other provocative subjects at exponentialwisdom.com

The Earth needs a good lawyer

“The Earth needs a good lawyer.”

—Seth Godin, American Author

Image of Earth

Image from nasa.gov

These days it appears that the next gold rush is in space. Whether it is mining asteroids or creating settlements on Mars, there is no question there are lots of big bets being made by such pioneers as Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk, Richard Branson, among others.

Given the trends we observe today, what shape will planet Earth be in by the time, decades from now, we realize all the possibilities we see today?

Even if we create a settlement on Mars with a million people, there will still be eight billion, nine hundred and ninety-nine million people left here on Earth. They will be looking into the night sky, possibly wondering, What have we done?

EXERCISE:

Where and in what ways are you a protector/defender of our beautiful Earth? What immediate actions can all of us take to not ever need a lawyer to stand up for Mother Nature?