I have gone ahead despite the pounding in the heart

“I have gone ahead despite the pounding in the heart that says: Turn Back!”

—Erica Jong, American Novelist and Poet

Image of a skier doing an aerial jump

Image from Unsplash by Jörg Angeli

The majority of people I know don’t normally consider themselves as particularly brave and courageous. Many might look at the amazing firefighters in California and say, “That’s not me” or “I could never do that.”

I’d like you to consider that you might be at least a bit more courageous than you give yourself credit for. Examine times in your personal or professional life in which you stepped up to a particular challenging, heart-pounding situation and moved forward through the fear. Your commitment was far bigger than your comfort.

EXERCISE:

Where and how can and will you use the signal of a pounding heart to step forward rather than back to more fully realize your most important and valued commitments?

Friday Review of Courage

Friday Review: Courage

How do you define courage? Here are a few courage-related posts you may have missed. Click the link to read the full message.

 

“Hope awakens courage. He who can implant courage in the human soul is the best physician.”

 

 

 

“The Roller Coaster is my life…It’s mountaineering; It’s wanting to get to the very top of yourself.”

 

 

 

“If you think you are too small to make a difference, try sleeping with a mosquito.”

 

 

 

Obstacles in your path

“There are plenty of obstacles in your path. Don’t allow yourself to become one of them.”

—Author Unknown

Image of a locked fence

Image from Unsplash by Jason Blackeye

The TV show, Running Wild with Bear Grylls, comes to mind when I think about today’s quote.

In this show, famed adventurist and survivalist Bear Grylls takes top stars from the entertainment and sports worlds into the most remote and pristine locations in the world for a 48-hour journey of a lifetime.

Cast members face their deepest fears and tackle everything from wild animals to rock rappelling through some of the world’s most unforgiving wilderness.

We all face a wide variety of daily external obstacles that fall short of these life-threatening challenges. We also create many internal challenges that stop us in our tracks, as abruptly as if our lives were on the line.

EXERCISE:

Where are you currently your own worst enemy, or putting up your own internal barriers? What one courageous action can you take today to create a breakthrough in this area?

Good ideas are not adopted automatically

“Good ideas are not adopted automatically. They must be driven into practice with courageous patience.”

—Hyman Rickover, 20th Century U.S. Navy Admiral

How many good or even great ideas ever see the light of day and come to fruition? If you have ever participated in goal setting or strategic planning sessions, you clearly know the percentages are fairly low.

Consider the field of venture capital, and all those many start-up and Silicon Valley hopefuls. Even the popular Shark Tank TV show has a pretty modest scoreboard on which hopefuls hit it out of the park.

Perhaps it is due to a lack of courage and/or patience that many good ideas never come to pass.

EXERCISE:

Where would mobilizing your own courageous patience be the key to the adoption of more of your brightest ideas? How would greater courageous patience also be a key ingredient to a happier and more fulfilling life?

If You Think You are Too Small

“If you think you are too small to make a difference, try sleeping with a mosquito.”

Dalai Lama XIV

Closeup of a mosquito on human skin

Image from Flickr by ASCOM Prefeitura de Votuporanga

Did you know that the mosquito is the deadliest creature on the planet? More people have died by the mosquito’s transmission of diseases such as Malaria than all other poisonous, carnivorous, or other dangerous creatures combined.

How much influence have these tiny pests had on your enjoyment of a summer evening, or in an attempt to get a good night’s sleep in a tent?

EXERCISE:

How can you reduce or eliminate your limited views of yourself and become far more intentional and courageous to make a bigger difference in your world?

How can you bring your own positive bite into your communities, to spread more of the good things in life?

The Roller Coaster is My Life

“The Roller Coaster is my life…It’s mountaineering; It’s wanting to get to the very top of yourself.”

—Paulo Coehlo, Eleven Minutes

Image of a roller coaster

Image from Unsplash by Claire Satera

The full quote for today is:
“The roller coaster is my life; Life is a fast, dizzying game; Life is a parachute jump; It’s taking chances, falling over and getting up again; It’s mountaineering; It’s wanting to get to the very top of yourself.”

Based on this quote, you might think I am a massive risk taker, tempting life and limb on a daily basis. I’ve had my share of adventures along the way, but for the most part, I am a bit more of an introvert than you might guess.

I do, however, love the idea of wanting to get to the very top of oneself, base on those life mountains or even hills we choose to climb.

EXERCISE:

In what areas of your life do you have the greatest desire for growth and achievement? How and in what ways can you be a bit more bold and courageous to get to the top of yourself in these important life domains?

Friday Review Courage 011218

FRIDAY REVIEW: COURAGE

What role does courage play in your daily life? Here are a few courage-related posts you may have missed. Click the link to read the message.

“Become so wrapped up in something that you forget to be afraid.”

 

 

 

 

“Do one thing each day that scares you.”

 

 

 

 

“You can’t leave a footprint that lasts if you’re always walking on tiptoe.”

 

 

Hope Awakens Courage

“Hope awakens courage. He who can implant courage in the human soul is the best physician.”

—Karl Ludwig Von Knebel, 18th Century German Poet

Image of a hand

Image from selfhypnosis.com

It is pleasant to consider the profession of coaching as a form of healthcare for the human soul.

So are the skills of teaching, mentoring, counseling, parenting, and even friendship.

What other types of relationships can you describe that induce, elicit, and awaken hope and courage in others?

EXERCISE:

How can and will you use your healing powers to generate greater possibilities and hopeful courage in those for whom you care?

when you connect with people

“When you connect with people from the core, you learn a whole lot more.”

-Author Unknown

Image of people in a circle

Image from JumpCloud

Relationships and connecting with others are among the most valuable skills any of us can have. Books, blogs, podcasts, seminars, and other resources on this subject abound, yet most of us fall short of the level of excellence and mastery we desire.

Today’s quote points to the importance of experiencing one another at a far deeper level than many of us are willing to go. We’re afraid because of the level of openness and vulnerability inherent in the depths those relationships require.

EXERCISE:

How can and will you be more courageous to express your core beliefs, values, and emotions to deepen your most valued relationships?

Avoiding Problems

“Avoiding a problem doesn’t solve it.”

—Bonnie Jean Thornily, Illustrator

Image of an ostrich with its head in the sand

Image from www.dailymail.co.uk

The ostrich doesn’t really bury its head in the sand —it wouldn’t be able to breathe! But the female ostrich does dig holes in the dirt as nests for her eggs. Occasionally, she’ll put her head in the hole and turn her eggs.

People, on the other hand, often “bury their heads in the sand,” ignoring problems for long periods of time, hoping they will simply go away.

EXERCISE:

What issue or problem have you been avoiding, professionally or personally? Where would summoning the courage to take this issue “head on” make the biggest difference?