He who walks in anothers tracks

“He who walks in another’s tracks leaves no footprints.”

—Joan L. Brannon

Image of a man walking down a railroad track

Photo by Brooke Lark on Unsplash

A favorite book I read this past year is Mastery, by Robert Green, which was actually published in 2012.

This well-researched book was no light read for me, and I found myself taking in only five to ten pages at a time to ingest and digest its contents.

Masters often engage in various apprenticeships and mentoring relationships with others more skilled or experienced than they. A significant take away-for me was that there is always a point where they must step out of the footsteps of their mentors to venture out on the own personal mastery journey.

EXERCISE:

Where is it time for you to step out of the tracks others have left, to make your own unique footprints in the world?

The worst thing about new books

“The worst thing about new books is that they keep us from reading the old ones.”

—Joseph Joubert, 19th Century French Essayist

Image of a large library

Image from Flickr by Saimad

Because I am heavily invested in personal and professional development, I am always on the lookout for the next ground-breaking book. I thrive on new ideas and the concept of finding a better way to improve the world.

If you are like me, you sometimes find new books a bit of a letdown in that they often repackage old ideas in ways that fall short of the originals.

EXERCISE:

Consider a Google search on this phrase:

The greatest ___________ books of all time. Fill in the blank with whatever types of books you value and enjoy most.

 

“Do more of what makes you Awesome.”

“Do more of what makes you awesome.”

-Author Unknown

Photo from Flickr by Sam Howitz

Photo from Flickr by Sam Howitz

Awesome is such an awesome word.

For years, I’ve encouraged my clients to be their personal best, pursue excellence, and of course, discover their strengths.

What is it that you do that literally induces awe in others?

Some might describe awe as a heightened sense of admiration or even a reverence for your gift, unique ability, or area of personal mastery.

Whatever it is, doing more of it will most certainly bring you great fulfillment, satisfaction, and most likely produce quantifiable rewards.

EXERCISE:

Consider asking a handful of people who know you best what makes you awesome. This is not the time to be timid or overly humble. Hopefully these conversations will shed some light on gifts or talents you have overlooked.

Once you come down from the high you will likely experience in these discussions, get out there and let others in your world know about the awesome qualities and abilities you see in them.