Sometimes the heart sees what is invisible to the eye

“Sometimes the heart sees what is invisible to the eye.”

—H. Jackson Browne, Jr., Author of Life’s Little Instruction Book

Image of a blue barn door with a large red heart painted on it

Image from Unsplash by Jon Tyson

The human heart is an extraordinary organ. Weighing about ten ounces, this fist-sized miracle pumps life-giving oxygen and nutrient-rich blood throughout our bodies, without missing a beat.

The heart, like our brain, generates a powerful electromagnetic field. The electrocardiogram (ECG) has a field more than 60 times greater (based on amplitude) than brain waves generate in an electroencephalogram (EEG).

Some researchers believe that this electromagnetic field can code and connect individuals beyond our five senses, potentially transmitting and exchanging both positive and negative energies.

EXERCISE:

How would viewing life from a more heartfelt perspective help you see more of the invisible wonders of life?

You may wish to explore the work of the Heart Math Institute to see what they have been working on for over 25 years.

There is a bigger picture

“There’s a bigger picture. Just step back from the canvas.”

—attributed to Ilona Simone

One of my favorite Netflix Original Series is called Tales by Light.

Each episode highlights a specific masterful photographer, examining their world in great detail. The techniques they use to capture our world include a wide variety of lenses, and viewing their subjects from multiple levels.

From ground level to the top of a ladder, or a bird’s eye view from a hot air balloon or drone, their images reveal more of their canvas, and a far more interesting and beautiful perspective on their subject.

EXERCISE:

Where in either your personal or professional world are you simply too close to a particular subject? Where would stepping back to gain greater objectivity and perspective shed more and better light on your view of your world?

The reason I talk to myself is

“The reason I talk to myself is because I’m the only one whose answers I accept.”

—George Carlin, Late American stand-up comedian and social critic

Image of George Carlin

Image from content.time

George Carlin, who passed away in 2008, was noted for his black comedy. No subject escaped his probing and ingenious mind. He had a surprising and penetrating way of making aspects of human nature hilarious to millions of people.

Today’s quote points out that we are constantly talking to ourselves and find our own opinions, perspective, and general views on all subjects of greatest appeal and value. Carlin knew that our favorite subject was ourselves. He was clever enough to poke fun at it, making him one of the most popular comedians of all time.

EXERCISE:

Where and how can the understanding that each of us talks to ourselves and prefers our owns answers help you improve your relationships and the results you desire, personally or professionally?

Better keep yourself clean and bright

“Better keep yourself clean and bright; you are the window through which you must see the world.”

—George Bernard Shaw, 20th Century Irish playwright

Image of man washing windows on a tall building

Image from Flickr by Jason Bain

It is early spring here in Michigan. With increased daylight, warmer days, and a few more birds chirping, many of us are embarking on some spring cleaning.

Two activities that are often on the list are cleaning or replacing the furnace filter, and washing the windows, to clean our air and brighten our views.

EXERCISE:

How can and will you clean your own perceptual filters and brighten your windows on the world to lead a more fulfilling and satisfying life?

Consider doing this exercise with your family or work community so that you can engage additional social support and increase the likelihood of success.

Don’t Be Discouraged

“Don’t be discouraged. It’s often the last key in the bunch that opens the lock.”

—Author Unknown

Image of keys in a circle

Image from Flickr by Hayley Mechelle

What current personal or professional issue has you upset, frustrated, and perhaps at a breaking point? Where are you ready to throw in the towel and give up on a matter of great importance?

You may even feel that you have tried everything possible and don’t have it in you to go on.

Beyond the RAH-RAH of the If at first you don’t succeed… stuff, how can you remain patient and persist in new and different actions to open the locks of opportunities you seek?

EXERCISE:

Seek out the support of a friend, mentor, family member, or coach to tackle this matter. They will likely help you find the inner strength to go on, and the added perspective to achieve what you desire.

Friday Review Perspective

FRIDAY REVIEW: PERSPECTIVE

Our perspective can change in an instant. Here are some perspective-related posts you may have missed. Click to read the full message.

“The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes.”

 

 

 

 

“The optimist already sees the scar over the wound; the pessimist sees the wound underneath the scar.”

 

 

 

“There are people who would love to have your bad days.”

 

 

 

 

 

Keep the Bigger Perspective in Mind

“Keep the bigger perspective in mind, not getting caught in life’s little whirlpools.”

—Barbara Ann Kipfer, Author of Self-Meditation

Image of a whirlpool

Image from Clipartfest

What are some of the events in your personal or professional life that have brought you down, upset you, or even caused you to feel angry?

Select just one event, and play with it through a variety of perspectives to see if you can rise out of the downward spiral.

Who in your world would barely notice the issue, or not be impacted at all? How would they view this issue?

Who do you know who would find the lesson in this issue and use the silver lining to better their life?

Who in your life is creative and innovate, always finding a way to achieve their objectives in spite of obstacles or challenges?

EXERCISE:

What new and different approaches and perspectives can you try to better navigate the swirling whirlpools that pull you down?

Consider asking some of the people you identified above for their coaching.

the truth you believe in

“The truth you believe in and cling to makes you unavailable to hear anything new.”

-Pema Chödrön, American Buddhist nun

Image of Pema Chödrön

Image of Pema Chödrön from calmfulliving.com

When was the last time you had a discussion with a friend, family member, or colleague in which they said, “I know” one or more times?

Consider that at such moments their beliefs and opinions are firmly cemented into their minds. Unfortunately, in many cases, they have literally stopped listening to any other perspective.

Turning this situation around, how often do you say “I know” to others, or just covertly think it to yourself?

EXERCISE:

Where and on what subjects are you clinging too tightly to your own point of view or perspective, making you unavailable to new possibilities?

How would an “I don’t know / I’m not sure / I’m curious” perspective create the greatest value?

If you don’t read people well

“If you don’t read people well, you’re climbing up a wobbly career ladder, blindfolded.”

⏤Dan Rust, author of Workplace Poker

Image of "Workplace Poker" book cover

When you hear the phrase, “office politics,” what comes to mind? If you are like many, this idea draws strong reactions, including hate, disgust, annoyance, or for some, a bit of curiosity. Regardless of your feelings, office politics are a fact of life. In Workplace Poker, Dan Rust suggests we either learn to play it or we are likely to be played.

His advise on learning to read people includes:

  • Minimize your own emotional reactions, and set aside preconceived notions, judgements, and expectations. You can’t get inside someone else’s head until you get out of your own.
  • Learn to be a third-party observer. Notice how people speak, dress, act, and interact with others. You will gain a baseline of their behavior, which can be revealing and useful.

EXERCISE:

Consider picking up a copy of Workplace Poker if you have ever experienced bumps or dips in your career trajectory. This resource can also prove useful in many community and non-profit organizations.

Each night, when I go to sleep, I die

“Each night, when I go to sleep, I die, and the next morning, when I wake up, I am reborn.”

⏤Mahatma Gandhi, leader of the Indian independence movement in British-ruled India

Image of a man sleeping on the sofa with his bulldog

Image from Flickr by Andrew Roberts

When I first read this quote, I felt pretty down at the thought of dying each evening, with a sense of finality that something⏤in this case, my day⏤was over.

Many of us experience similar feelings when our weekends, vacations, or other happy times come to an end.

Consider that the same is true for bad times, and uncomfortable events we may want to wish away.

To wake up and be reborn each new day excites me with the possibilities of new and wondrous things I can intentionally do, with a fresh perspective and a fresh canvas to draw upon.

EXERCISE:

How can you interpret today’s quote to make the very best of each new day you are fortunate enough to experience?