The Roller Coaster is My Life

“The Roller Coaster is my life…It’s mountaineering; It’s wanting to get to the very top of yourself.”

—Paulo Coehlo, Eleven Minutes

Image of a roller coaster

Image from Unsplash by Claire Satera

The full quote for today is:
“The roller coaster is my life; Life is a fast, dizzying game; Life is a parachute jump; It’s taking chances, falling over and getting up again; It’s mountaineering; It’s wanting to get to the very top of yourself.”

Based on this quote, you might think I am a massive risk taker, tempting life and limb on a daily basis. I’ve had my share of adventures along the way, but for the most part, I am a bit more of an introvert than you might guess.

I do, however, love the idea of wanting to get to the very top of oneself, base on those life mountains or even hills we choose to climb.

EXERCISE:

In what areas of your life do you have the greatest desire for growth and achievement? How and in what ways can you be a bit more bold and courageous to get to the top of yourself in these important life domains?

For Things to Reveal Themselves to Us

“For things to reveal themselves to us we need to be ready to abandon our views about them.”

—Thich Nhat Hahn, Vietnamese monk

My first career out of college was that of a science teacher. I’m still that guy who watches nature programs, The Discovery Channel, and I never miss an episode of How the Universe Works!

Are you a student of science, the scientific method, or the notable rock star Nobel Prize winning scientists of history? You might be shocked at just how long it took for their scientific contemporaries and the public to consider and adopt what many, at the time, thought crazy ideas about how things work.

EXERCISE:

In what areas of your life would holding on too tightly to what you know and believe be limiting?

How would loosening your grip or even abandoning some of your current views reveal new possibilities and opportunities to better your world?

Life is Amazing

“Life is amazing, and the teacher had best prepare himself to be a medium for that amazement.”

—Edward Blishen, 20th Century British author

Image of an eye and eyebrow

Image from Unsplash by Amanda Dalbjorn

Have you heard of Sam Horn? If not, look her up, and strongly consider reading her newsletter and books.

She often shares a concept she calls The Eyebrow Test, which refers to the ideas, concepts, and life events that literally make your eyebrows move upward, demonstrating great interest, or in the case of today’s quote, amazement.

EXERCISE:

How and in what ways can you more fully engage in your own life to experience far more raised eyebrows of amazement?

How can you share such moments or help others in your world experience greater amazement through your potential roles as teacher, mentor, parent, or coach?

Rise above the little things

“Rise above the little things.”

—John Burroughs, 19th Century American essayist

Have you heard of the book, Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff?

There is a companion workbook to help you put many of the techniques and strategies from the book into practice.

I suggest a three-step process to help you rise above the little things that often bring us all down:

EXERCISE:

Step One: Conduct a 5-10 minute inventory of the “little things” that hold you back, personally or professionally. A list of 3-5 in each category is a good start.

Step Two: Clarify the specific benefits or desired future possible if these pesky or intolerable issues were handled.

Step Three: Summon the courage, fortitude, and grit to become a bigger, more capable version of yourself. Take the necessary action and/or shift your perspective to have many of these “little things” fade away.

Feel free to reply to this post and let me know how things go.

Friday Review Art

FRIDAY REVIEW: ART

What role does art play in your life? Here are a few art-related posts you may have missed. Click the links to read the messages.

“If you ask me what I came to do in this world, I, an artist, will answer you: I am here to live out loud.”

 

 

 

 

“Life is the art of drawing without an eraser.”

 

 

 

 

“All the arts are apprenticeship. The big art is our life.”

 

 

 

 

As soon as you trust yourself you will know how to live

“As soon as you trust yourself, you will know how to live.”

—Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, 19th Century German Writer & Statesman

Image from wordandspiritministries

What is it to live a good life?

How does one measure a life well lived?

What intrinsic and extrinsic factors are your gyroscopic guides on this great adventure?

Many people are giving more thought to this, particularly as they look in the mirror and see the aging process in effect, or pine on what they were once able to do years earlier.

Many experts, happiness gurus, and people who live “in the moment” encourage all of us to explore our emotions and feelings in order to tap into these trustworthy cornerstones of how to live.

EXERCISE:

Where and how can you more fully tap into your thoughts, emotions, and feelings to assure yourself that you are indeed on the right life path?

you can’t take a crash course in serenity

“You can’t take a crash course in serenity.”

—Shirley MacLaine, American actress and author

Image from Melissa Heisler

Shirley MacLaine is an American film, TV, and theatre actress, a singer, dancer, activist, and author who has achieved much and earned many awards in her 60+ year career.

Her well-know interest in New Age spirituality has even made its way into films, including Albert Brook’s romantic comedy, Defending Your Life, where we are introduced to the concept of past lives through the “Past Life Pavilion.”

Most of us would like a far larger helping of peace of mind and serenity, although they appear to be contrary to our high velocity, quick-fix world that generally over-promises and under-delivers.

EXERCISE:

In what ways can you slow down and take a deeper inner journey to realize greater serenity in your life?

Ask those you know and trust what they find helpful. Consider a bit of experimentation to see what works best for you.

Real Happiness is Cheap Enough

“Real happiness is cheap enough, yet how dearly we pay for its counterfeit.”

—Hosea Ballou, 19th Century American Theologian

Image of book cover "Happier"

In his 2007 book, Happier, Tal Ben Shahar, PhD, introduces us to different archetypes people commonly pursue in their “Happiness Journey.” They include:

The Hedonism Archetype, in which people pursue present pleasure and often experience future detriment.

The Rat Racer Archetype subordinates the present to the future, suffering now for the purpose of some anticipated future gain.

The Happiness Archetype finds enjoyment in their present efforts (i.e. the journey) while also knowing it will lead them to a fulfilling future.

EXERCISE:

What no-cost or low-cost activities, rituals, or daily behaviors provide you with enjoyment and pleasure, while serving you in realizing your personal and professional goals?

How can and will you insert more of these activities into every day, to lead a far happier life?

Think like a proton and stay positive

“Think like a proton and stay positive.”

Image of Professor Proton from "The Big Bang Theory"

Image from hollywoodreporter

 

I happen to be a fan of the TV sitcom, The Big Bang Theory. In recent years they added a new character named Professor Proton, played by Bob Newhart.

Professor Proton had a significant influence on young Sheldon, which eventually led him to his career as a theoretical physicist.

Beyond the always humorous, engaging antics of the shows characters, I am always left with pleasant and positive perspective at the closing scene.

EXERCISE:

How can you shift your world from the negativity of an electron or the neutrality of a neutron, to be far more positive – like a proton – today and every day?

Friday Review AGE

FRIDAY REVIEW: AGE

How youthful are you? What is your attitude toward aging? Here are a few age-related posts you may have missed. Click the links to read the full messages.

 

“We are always the same age inside.”

 

 

 

 

“What becomes fragile when we age is not our bodies as much as our egos. The best time to take some daring steps is when we get older.”

 

 

 

 

“Youth is eternal to those with a curious, loving, joyous spirit.”