“A level-headed person is one who doesn’t get dizzy doing good turns.”

“A level-headed person is one who doesn’t get dizzy doing good turns.”

—O.A. Battista, 20th Century Canadian-American chemist and author

Image from Unsplash by Dayne Topkin

There is no question that the world is a dizzying place these days. What has recently changed in your personal and professional communities that has turned your life upside down?

To help you stabilize your world and regain some footing, many folks are bringing new levels of empathy, compassion, and generosity to those around them. What good turns are you observing these days in your various communities?

EXERCISE:

How and in what ways can you both acknowledge and actively participate in these efforts to realize a more level-headed world?

Please reply to this post with some examples of the good turns you are seeing and doing to regain your footing.

“If your habits don’t line up with your dream, then you either need to change your habits or change your dream.”

“If your habits don’t line up with your dream, then you either need to change your habits or change your dream.”

—Sam Horn, American author and communications strategist

Image from Unsplash by Jakob Owens

Thoughts become things only when we take action.

Wishful thinking is not a good strategy for success. Even new millionaires who won the lottery knew they had first to buy a ticket.

To pretty much guarantee yourself a winning ticket in your life lottery, take a good look at your habits and daily practices.

If you are healthy inside and out, you likely eat well, exercise, get adequate rest, and probably have a few other self-care and spiritual practices.

What are your dreams for this year and beyond? To what degree are you progressing toward them through your daily efforts?

EXERCISE:

Consider swapping out one new good habit for one that is holding you back. To explore how to do this, consider studying and applying the work of Charles Duhigg in his brilliant book, The Power of Habit.

“Goals allow you to control the direction of change in your favor.”

“Goals allow you to control the direction of change in your favor.”

—Brian Tracy, Canadian-American motivational speaker/author

Image from Unsplash by Isaac Smith

Do yourself a big favor and set some worthy goals for the new year.

If you are like many of us, you are thinking, I do this every year, or maybe why bother?

Perhaps, like many people, you stick to your resolutions until sometime in February, when things fall apart due to bad weather, waning discipline, or competing priorities at home or work.

Whatever you do or don’t do, you can bet that changes are coming. The question to ask yourself is whether you are going to control their direction, or simply react to whatever comes your way.

EXERCISE:

Please consider improving your odds of success by adding a variety of social and structural supports. To learn more about how to do this, put the book Influencer – The Power to Change Anything on your holiday and new year reading list.

“All beginnings are difficult.”

“All beginnings are difficult.”

—Rabbinic maxim

Image from Unsplash by Jon Tyson

Letting today’s quote really sink in can change your life.

Can you recall how many times, personally or professionally, you were reluctant to begin an activity or stopped your efforts too soon because your initial steps were awkward or challenging?

In such cases, we could consider the Biblical story of Job and his statement, “Man was born to toil.”

Going beyond any initial discomfort is fundamental to being productive and to the essential need for each of us to contribute and have a life of purpose.

EXERCISE:

Where and on what current matter would acknowledging that all beginnings are difficult provide you the needed courage, tenacity, and persistence to toil on to more fully realize your fullest potential and contribution to the world?

“The future has already arrived. It’s just not evenly distributed yet.”

“The future has already arrived. It’s just not evenly distributed yet.”

—William Gibson, American/Canadian speculative fiction writer

Image from Unsplash by Joshua Sortino

In his book, BOLD, Peter Diamonadis shares many interesting aspects of our global community, including a variety of new technologies creating exponential changes in our world.

His Six D’s of Exponential Organizations, detailed HERE are:

  • Digitization
  • Deception
  • Disruption
  • Demonetization
  • Dematerialization
  • Democratization

The Six D’s help us look at technologies and perhaps why they can lead to both upheaval and opportunity.

EXERCISE:

Consider picking up a copy of Peter’s book to increase your own awareness of the future that has already arrived. See where and how you can participate in the distribution process, to better your personal world and the world in general.

“If the pieces do not fit into your puzzle… try a different picture.”

“If the pieces do not fit into your puzzle… try a different picture.”

—Cass van Krah, British Artist

Image of a mandala puzzle

Image from Unsplash by Sheldon Nunes

What do you wish to change about your life? Look around your personal and professional worlds to see where things just don’t fit together as you would like.

For a fair percentage of my coaching clients, the focus is often on their current vocational efforts. They feel their current reality and path lack the passion and purpose they desire.

Working on a “Plan B,” in which their strengths, unique abilities, interests, and of course, core values, can be fully expressed has become their quest.

EXERCISE:

What personal and professional transitions do you wish to make in the next year or two? How can you share this intention with friends, family, mentors, and perhaps a coach, to help you create a new picture for your life?

The easier it is to do something

“The easier it is to do something, the harder it is to change the way you do it.”

—Steve Wozniak, Co-Founder of Apple, Inc.

Consider how easy it is to cross your arms, clasp your hands, and brush your teeth. You probably don’t need to think about these tasks because they occur habitually.

What about traits like hitting the snooze button, eating out of boredom, watching TV or using social media? In many situations, taking the fastest and easiest path is helpful, productive, or at least has no real negative consequences.

On the other hand, sometimes what is easy can have significant negative impact to the lives we profess to desire.

EXERCISE:

What automatic and easy behaviors do you practice that are limiting or preventing you from realizing your top priority goals? What disciplined effort and added support can and will you put in place to fulfill your commitments in these areas?

What do we live for

“What do we live for, if it is not to make life less difficult for each other?”

—George Eliot, pen name of Mary Anne Evans, 19th Century English novelist

Image of a woman holding coins and a note stating "make a change"

Image from Unsplash by Kat Yukawa

One of my most remarkable clients is the CEO of a local non-profit organization called Forgotten Harvest – the second largest food rescue organization in America. Last year, he and his team – and large numbers of volunteers – provided more than 40 millions pounds of food, valued at over 70 million dollars, to people in the community experiencing “food insecurity.”

Recently, he was interviewed on a top radio station in town about his work and the life journey that brought him to his role in this important organization.

Through this interview, I gained an even more vivid picture of his life and his fundamental purpose to make a positive difference in the lives of others within his communities.

EXERCISE:

What is your life purpose?

How do you currently contribute and make life less difficult for others?

What additional efforts can and will you take to more fully realize an even greater purpose with your life?

If all it took to upend the status quo was the truth

“If all it took to upend the status quo was the truth, we would have changed a long time ago.”

—Seth Godin, American Author

In Seth Godin’s newest book, This is Marketing, he suggests that to be effective, all marketers must have the courage to create tension. Some people actively seek tension because it works to push or pull those we hope to serve over the gap from the present to a better future.

For those who resist change and prefer the relative comfort of the status quo, these influences/marketing messages fall on deaf ears. In such cases, the truth does not set us free, for fear of whatever future we wish to avoid.

Godin suggests that the status quo doesn’t shift because something is true, it shifts because culture changes, and the engine of culture is status.

EXERCISE:

Examine where you and others in your personal and professional communities embrace change and find yourself open and receptive to the abundance of marketing messages coming your way. Where might saying yes and embracing such new ways of thinking or acting improve your status?

The great secret about goals and visions

“The great secret about goals and visions is not the future they describe, but the change in the present they engender.”

—David Allen, American Productivity Consultant

Image of a circle of people looking down at the camera

Image from Unslpash by RawPixel

I hope you had a very happy holiday season, and that your new year is off to an outstanding start. Perhaps you are like most of us in that you set about to revisit your visions for the new year, and establish “stretch” goals for where you see yourself professionally and personally.

What progress, skills, habits, and achievements will put a big smile on your face? Perhaps most importantly, what daily changes will be required to realize what you deeply desire?

David Allen suggests, in today’s quote, that our visions and goals provide the leverage of our commitment to changing our present actions that will have us realize the futures we desire.

EXERCISE:

Consider displaying the following quote by Tuli Kupferberg in your personal or professional environment as a daily reminder to tap into one of the secrets to a better future:

“When patterns are broken, new worlds will emerge.”

Also consider writing it with the second part first:

“New worlds will emerge when patterns are broken.”