“Goals are like magnets. They’ll attract the things that make them come true.”

“Goals are like magnets. They’ll attract the things that make them come true.”

—Anthony Robins

Image from Unsplash by Markus Winkler

Years ago, I was challenged by a colleague to look at goals differently.

Instead of looking at a goal through the SMART lens, he suggested using the words “To Be” and “To Have” to express goals as a future and not simply as a way to measure or quantify an outcome.

Since most of us value our health, I propose this example:

Goal Statement: To be healthy and fit
Measurable Results: 1) To lose 15 pounds by December 31
Goal Statement: 2) To lower my cholesterol below 200 and get off meds by this time next year
Goal Statement: 3) To have my RealAge be less than my chronological age within three months

EXERCISE:

How can and will you describe your goals as futures, to magnetize your own inspired efforts and other resources to make these dreams come true?

“It is very sad to me that some people are so intent on leaving their mark on the world that they don’t care if that mark is a scar.”

“It is very sad to me that some people are so intent on leaving their mark on the world that they don’t care if that mark is a scar.”

—John Michael Green, American Author of Looking for Alaska

What constitutes a good day? What are the foundations of a good life? Where do you look when considering such questions?

Luckily, the research on such matters is extensive. Virtually all sources agree that having purpose and making a positive difference in the lives of others is fundamental.

In his book, Give and Take, Adam Grant points to the fact that giving and contributing to others and society provides both intrinsic and extrinsic rewards. The book, The Five Love Languages, points to the ways we and others in our world demonstrate love for each other, through simple daily acts of generosity and care.

EXERCISE:

Where and in what ways can you make an even bigger and more positive mark on your world? How and in what ways can you encourage and support others in your various communities to do the same?

Friday Review: Bravery

FRIDAY REVIEW: BRAVERY

At what times in your life have you made a choice that required bravery? What brave actions have you seen in others? Here are a few bravery-related posts you may have missed.

 

“Be strong enough to stand alone, smart enough to know when you need help, and brave enough to ask for it.”

 

 

 

“I have gone ahead despite the pounding in the heart that says: Turn Back!”

 

 

 

“The man who runs may fight again.”

 

 

 

 

 

“Leaders don’t force people to follow—they invite them on a journey.”

“Leaders don’t force people to follow—they invite them on a journey.”

—Charles S. Lauer, late publisher of Modern Healthcare magazine

Image from Unsplash by Matt Heaton

We have all been taken to school lately on the subject of Leadership. What messages are you hearing that touch and stir your head, heart, and soul?

Who is speaking a future that resonates on the frequency of your vision and value?

Who is describing a journey with passion and purpose? Who is inviting you to contribute your best to a worthy mission?

When strong leaders demonstrate such qualities in words, actions, and enduring character, they engender us to follow and become leaders as well.

EXERCISE:

Where have you been called and invited on an important journey?

Where can and will you invite others in your personal or professional communities to join you in creating a better world?

“Take only memories, leave only footprints.”

“Take only memories, leave only footprints.”

—Chief Seattle, Duwamish Tribe Leader & namesake of the City of Seattle

Image form Unsplash by NASA

Many of us are living simpler and more essentially these days. Taking less seems to be giving many of us more of the intrinsic things we value most.

I can recall visiting the Disney World exhibit sponsored by Kodak—the powerhouse of photography—when my kids were little. The catchy tune “Making Memories” inspired us to take a photo safari around the park, taking snapshots of us wearing the wild hats in each gift shop, without making a single purchase.

I also easily recall being glued to the TV in 1969 when man landed on the moon. Although some rocks were taken for study, the most impressive visual I recall was the astronauts jumping for joy, and of course, the many footprints they left, establishing the fact that they were there.

EXERCISE:

How would your life become even more fulfilling and meaningful if you embraced Chief Seattle’s coaching?

 

“We wander for distraction, but we travel for fulfillment.”

“We wander for distraction, but we travel for fulfillment.”

—Hillaire Belloc, 20th Century British-French writer and historian

Image from Unsplash by Anastasia Petrova

To what degree are you a wanderer or a traveler? Since most of us are not using trains, planes, or automobiles as often as usual, consider taking a look at your media and social media journeys.

How often do you find yourself surfing the web and giving your remote a workout to fill the time and distract you from boredom or the hard realities we are all facing in this pandemic?

Alternatively, how are you planning your days with intention and focus, to travel paths toward specific destinations and goals?

EXERCISE:

Where and how would more traveling and less wandering through your days lead to a more fulfilling life?

What one specific action will you take today to begin this journey?

“No matter how far the distance you have traveled or the failures that have gathered… Hope would still meet you anywhere.”

“No matter how far the distance you have traveled or the failures that have gathered… Hope would still meet you anywhere.”

—Dodinsky, Author of In the Garden of Thoughts

Image from Unsplash by Marc-Olivier Jodoin

How far have you traveled in the past seven months? How many failures and setbacks have you experienced during the same period? How hopeful are you about the future?

What information and clues did you use as you examined these questions?

We have all heard the idea that Hope in itself is not a strategy. For many—including me—it sure does inspire and mobilize us to take bolder, more committed action toward a better future for ourselves and those in our communities.

EXERCISE:

Where and in what ways can you meet, greet, and embrace Hope wherever you are, regardless of the distance traveled or the failures gathered? What steps can and will you take today, tomorrow, and down the road to realize the hopeful future you desire?

Friday Review: Opinion

FRIDAY REVIEW: OPINION

On what criteria do you base your opinions? How do you react to the opinions of others? Here are a few opinion-related posts you may have missed.

 

“When the heart is afire, some sparks will fly out of the mouth.”

 

 

 

“The reason I talk to myself is because I’m the only one whose answers I accept.”

 

 

 

“Seek council, not opinion.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

“When you take things for granted, the things you are granted get taken.”

“When you take things for granted, the things you are granted get taken.”

—Author Unknown

Image from Unsplash by specphotops

How true is today’s quote for you?

Please don’t skim over this one or move on too quickly to your busy day.

Take a 2-5 minute pause now—or at a break you give yourself today—to examine some or all of the items on the following list, for yourself and others in your world:

• Health
• Relationships
• The Environment
• Social Justice
• Democracy
• Faith
• Finances

EXERCISE:

Consider replying to this post with your thought and feelings.

What additional categories would you add to this list?

What specific area and what specific action will you take to more fully demonstrate your gratitude for all you’ve been given?

“When a flower doesn’t bloom you fix the environment in which it grows, not the flower.”

“When a flower doesn’t bloom you fix the environment in which it grows, not the flower.”

—Alexander Den Heijer, Dutch inspirational speaker

Image from Unsplash by Quino Al

Consider yourself a type of flower. Notice how you’ve grown and hopefully bloomed over the years. If you have been fortunate to show the world your colors and contributed your gifts and talents, consider giving thanks to the people and resources that surrounded you.

We are all born with the seed of possibility within us, and the evidence is clear—through examples such as early child education—of what a profound difference it makes throughout our lives.

EXERCISE:

In what ways can you nurture and enrich the environment in which you are placed? How and in what ways can and will you provide the fertile soil, sunshine, and life affirming waters to help others blossom in your personal and professional communities?