FRIDAY REVIEW: CONTRIBUTING

Friday Review: Contributing

In what ways do you contribute to others? In what ways do others contribute to your life? Here are a few contribution-related posts you may have missed.

 

“Business and life are like a bank account. You can’t take out more than you put in.”

 

 

 

“Absorb what is useful. Discard what is not. Add what is uniquely your own.”

 

 

 

“Good people bring out the good in people.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“You can attract luck simply by sharing your work publicly.”

“You can attract luck simply by sharing your work publicly.”

—James Clear, author, entrepreneur, and photographer

Image from Unsplash by Phil Hearing

Who are some of the luckiest people you know? What do they do for a living? How did you happen to learn about their work? Where and when did you observe a public appearance of their level of skill and mastery?

Where else do you see a correlation between perceived luck and the willingness of people to offer their work, art, music, and physical capabilities on a public stage?

How lucky have you been in your personal and professional communities? To what degree have you gotten up to bat and swung away, over and over, until some of your strike-outs became hits, and even a few home runs?

EXERCISE:

Where is it time to come out of the shadows to share your work publicly and increase your luck?

“Don’t raise your voice, improve your argument.”

“Don’t raise your voice, improve your argument.”

—Desmond Tutu, South African Anglican cleric and human rights activist

Image from thoroldnews

How often do you find yourself in an argument in your personal or professional world? They say the best way to win arguments is to avoid them. Beyond that, here are a few nuggets of wisdom from an article by Paul Sloane to consider:

  1. Stay calm and keep your cool or you will lose.
  2. Use facts as evidence for your position.
  3. Be curious rather than furious. Although this is similar to point one, questions can help you stay in control of the conversation, by making your opponent scramble for answers, and challenge their points.
  4. Listen carefully and be prepared to concede a good point.
  5. Appeal to your opponent’s higher values to go beyond logic. Use a little emotion by appealing to worthy motives that are hard to disagree with.

EXERCISE:

Check out Paul Sloane’s article How to Win an Argument — Do’s, Don’ts, and Sneaky Tactics

Please also check out these books to expand your communication mastery even further:

Fierce Conversations by Susan Scott
Crucial Conversations and Crucial Confrontations by Kerry Patterson

“The older I get, the greater power I seem to have to help the world. I am like a snowball — the further I am rolled, the more I gain.”

“The older I get, the greater power I seem to have to help the world. I am like a snowball — the further I am rolled, the more I gain.”

—Susan B. Anthony, 19th Century American social reformer and women’s rights activist

Image from britannica.com

Susan B. Anthony spent her life working for women’s rights. In 1888, at the age of 68, she helped to merge the two largest suffrage associations into one — The National American Women’s Suffrage Association, then led the group until 1900.

She traveled around the country giving speeches, gathering thousands of signatures on petitions, and lobbying Congress on suffrage for women.

Susan died in 1906, 14 years before women were given the right to vote. The 19th amendment was passed in 1920, one hundred years after her birth.

EXERCISE:

Who are some notable people from history who kept rolling and picked up steam well into their golden years?

How and in what ways can and will you continue to gain momentum and contribute the work of your heart and hands to the world?

“The role of a teacher is to introduce you to your inner teacher.”

“The role of a teacher is to introduce you to your inner teacher.”

—Loch Kelly, author, meditation teacher, psychotherapist

Image from Unsplash by Science in HD

Who were your favorite teachers when you were young? What made them so pivotal in your growth and development? What lessons did you learn that live on within you these decades later?

Mr. Felteberger was my high school physics teacher, Mr. Zimba was my grade school shop teacher, and Dr. Schmuckler from my college years all left great impressions on me, and their memory still brings many smiles.

Each of them brought tremendous generosity and enthusiasm to their art, and saw their role as building and shaping minds and characters to take into our futures.

Most significant was how they instilled and brought out my natural curiosity and passion for learning, which continues to this day.

EXERCISE:

How did the great teachers in your life light the fires of you own inner teacher? How can and will you be such an educational catalyst for others?

Friday Review: Persuasion

FRIDAY REVIEW: PERSUASION

Who are the most persuasive people you know? Here are a few persuasion-related post you may have missed.

 

“One of the best ways to persuade others is with your ears – by listening to them.”

 

 

 

“Your smile is your logo. Your personality is your business card. How you leave others feeling after having an experience with you becomes your trademark.”

 

 

 

“We are generally the better persuaded by the reasons we discover ourselves than by those given to us by others.”

 

 

“The inner life of any great thing will be incomprehensible to me until I develop and deepen an inner life of my own.”

“The inner life of any great thing will be incomprehensible to me until I develop and deepen an inner life of my own.”

—Parker J Palmer, Founder/Sr. Partner Emeritus, Center for Courage & Renewal

Image from Unsplash by Content Pixie

Examine all the greatness you see around you.

Who are the great people? Beyond the people, where are the places and things in your world that you consider extraordinary and wonderful?

If your list is very long, Parker Palmer would probably applaud you for doing the important and often difficult work of personal inquiry and introspection. By doing this inner work and seeing more deeply into our hearts, minds, and souls, we can find our own greatness and thus recognize it when we look to the outer world.

EXERCISE:

How and in what ways can and will you examine and reflect more deeply on your inner world to discover new levels of your own greatness?

With this increased awareness and clarity, look again and again at the people, places, and things around you, to embrace and delight in your wondrous world.

Please reply to this post and let me know what you discover!

 

“Don’t set your heart on so many things.”

“Don’t set your heart on so many things.”

—Epictetus, ancient Greek Philosopher

Image from Unsplash by Luis Villasmil

Our hearts can be a bit like our hands — they can only grasp and hold so much.

The media keeps telling us the lie, “You Can Have it All!”

Many who pursue the never-ending journey of MORE eventually consume their lives in a frantic race, rarely feeling extended periods of satisfaction, contentment, and peace of mind.

I love the idea that the best things in life are not things. Traveling lighter with what fills our hearts and nurtures our souls seems far wiser council.

EXERCISE:

If your heart is a bit heavy these days or if what you have is not fully satisfying, try a bit of physical, mental, and emotional uncluttering. Please reply to this post to let me know what you discover about your heart’s true desires.

“Love, like the ocean, continues beyond the horizon. And life, like the sun, shines where we cannot see.”

“Love, like the ocean, continues beyond the horizon. And life, like the sun, shines where we cannot see.”

—Author Unknown

Image from Unsplash by Aaron Doucett

A friend and client named Doug sent me today’s quote in a condolence card upon the passing of my father, Marvin, in early March.

Since my dad’s passing after a remarkable 94 years, I have noticed many significant signs that it was only his body that died. His spirit and soul are still very present beyond the horizon we can see with our mortal capacities.

As I was preparing my breakfast the day after Dad died, I looked out the window and saw a cardinal.

I’ve been told that when God sends a cardinal, it’s a visitor from heaven. Cardinals appear when loved ones are near. When you keep seeing a certain type of bird, it is usually a heaven-sent messenger of love for you. `

EXERCISE:

Take some time today to reflect on some of the important people in your life who have passed away. Note examples of how they continue to shine and show their love in your life.

Please reply to this post if you wish to share your own perspective and experiences.

“A defining moment is a short experience that is both memorable and meaningful.”

“A defining moment is a short experience that is both memorable and meaningful.”

—Chip & Dan Heath, The Power of Moments

Image from Unsplash by Charisse Kenion

I’d like to take you on a trip back in time.

After you read this post, close your eyes and reflect back on your life. Go back as far as you can to those memorable and meaningful moments, starting with your days as a child and all the way up to today. Take your time and visualize yourself and those who shared the moments with you.

Exploring old photo albums, yearbooks, and social media images and posts can expand your recollections.

Which events do you consider to be of greatest significance? What are the defining moments that shaped your values, beliefs, and character to have you become the person you are today?

EXERCISE:

How can and will you more consciously capture and appreciate more memorable and meaningful moments as you head into the days, weeks, and years that lie ahead?