“Yesterday already had its turn. Give today a shot.”

“Yesterday already had its turn. Give today a shot.”

—Author Unknown

What was yesterday like for you?

Go back 24 hours to see where you were, who you were with, and what you were doing. How would you rate this day compared to most?

What criteria do you use for higher versus lower ratings?

Did you get off to a quick start, keep up your energy and momentum and finish strong, or something less remarkable?

The good news, if you rated yourself high, is that you get to do it again with a few bonus outside the box efforts. The other good news is that even if your yesterday(s) were not so hot, you get to give today another shot.

EXERCISE:

Please consider using one of my favorite quotes by Tuli Kupferberg to guide today and many more of your tomorrows – When patterns are broken, new worlds emerge.

Friday Review: Love

Friday Review: Love

Happy Valentine’s Day! Here are a few posts about love you may have missed. Please be a peach and share them with someone special in your life!

 

“Love is a fruit in season at all times and within reach of every hand.”

 

 

 

“Because of a great love, one is courageous.”

 

 

 

 

“Love the giver more than the gift.”

 

 

 

 

“To some this may look like a sunset. But it’s a new dawn.”

“To some this may look like a sunset. But it’s a new dawn.”

—Chris Hadfield, first Canadian to walk in space

Image from Unsplash by Nelson Santos Jr.

When things come to an end—particularly what we consider “good” things—many people feel let down.

Consider the “wind down” after the holidays, a vacation, or even an enjoyable weekend.

These examples demonstrate the power of creative tension, and the impact that looking forward to things can have on our attitude and overall mental state.

EXERCISE:

In addition to feeling delight, joy, and happiness because you experience such positive events, how can you better see the new dawn each day brings?

Please reply to this post, and I will be happy to send you a one-page description of Creative Tension.

“If you can learn from hard knocks, you can also learn from soft touches.”

“If you can learn from hard knocks, you can also learn from soft touches.”

—Carolyn Kenmore, American model and author

Image from Unsplash by Eugenia Maximova

Being gritty and busting one’s butt seem to get lots of attention in relationship to pursuing and achieving success. When we look at athletic coaches in the locker room at halftime, what we expect is some form of aggressive, loud, “pump yourself up” motivational message.

Rarely do the quieter messages of encouragement and soft touches of support get any airtime. They are always drowned out by the massive number of strategies competing for our increasingly scarce attention.

EXERCISE:

Where in your personal or professional worlds are there whispered messages and soft, supportive touches that have something to teach you?

How can and will you tap into these more subtle inputs to become all you wish to be?

“Argue as if you are right and listen as if you are wrong.”

“Argue as if you are right and listen as if you are wrong.”

—Chip Conley, American hotelier, author, and speaker

Image from Unsplash by Maria Krisanova

We all desire autonomy. We all wish to be heard and to have what we say make an impact and influence our world. To do that, we must voice our thoughts and opinions, sometimes loudly.

After all, speaking about the future well beyond our current reality may never be noticed if we are silent or only whisper our views to avoid a ruckus.

We have two ears and one mouth. Our creator must have known that we would need to hear other’s voices that might be contrary to our own, and consider the possibility of our own views being incorrect.

EXERCISE:

To what degree do you currently speak up and argue for what you believe?

How carefully and completely do you currently listen to others, given the potential for being wrong?

In which of these areas and with whom would an extra effort make the biggest difference?

“I am not afraid of storms, for I am learning how to sail my ship.”

“I am not afraid of storms, for I am learning how to sail my ship.”

—Louisa May Alcott, 19th Century American author of Little Women

Image from Unsplash by Bobby Burch

If you enjoy good stories with wonderful characters, please go see the movie Little Women, or by all means, read the book.

In our daily lives we can all be coached by the times we see others face and overcome their challenges and obstacles. Doing so can instill the belief that we, too, can do the same.

EXERCISE:

Where in your personal or professional life are you facing considerably rough waters?

In what ways can and will you face these challenges boldly and courageously to chart your course toward a brighter future?

Friday Review: Procrastination

FRIDAY REVIEW: PROCRASTINATION

In what aspects of your life are you given to procrastination? Here are a few procrastination-related posts you may have missed.

 

“Life lived for tomorrow will always be just a day away from being realized.”

 

 

 

“Never put off for tomorrow what you can cancel.”

 

 

 

 

“Procrastination is the art of keeping up with yesterday.”

 

 

 

 

“If your habits don’t line up with your dream, then you either need to change your habits or change your dream.”

“If your habits don’t line up with your dream, then you either need to change your habits or change your dream.”

—Sam Horn, American author and communications strategist

Image from Unsplash by Jakob Owens

Thoughts become things only when we take action.

Wishful thinking is not a good strategy for success. Even new millionaires who won the lottery knew they had first to buy a ticket.

To pretty much guarantee yourself a winning ticket in your life lottery, take a good look at your habits and daily practices.

If you are healthy inside and out, you likely eat well, exercise, get adequate rest, and probably have a few other self-care and spiritual practices.

What are your dreams for this year and beyond? To what degree are you progressing toward them through your daily efforts?

EXERCISE:

Consider swapping out one new good habit for one that is holding you back. To explore how to do this, consider studying and applying the work of Charles Duhigg in his brilliant book, The Power of Habit.

“Aliveness comes from living a life of personal integrity in which…”

“Aliveness comes from living a life of personal integrity in which our outer actions match our inner values, beliefs, wishes, and dreams.”

—Jerry Colonna, American venture capitalist and professional coach

Image from Unsplash by Katya Austin

How alive do you feel at this moment?

Take a trip down memory lane into your 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, and ask yourself the same question. Dig a bit deeper to determine the intrinsic and extrinsic reasons for your answers.

What about projecting this question forward into your 60s, 70s, 80s and beyond?

How can you maintain and even increase your aliveness well into your senior years? What can and will you do to experience far more life in your years, not just more years in your life?

Life expectancy data points to many more of us becoming centurions due to exponential technologies, especially in the field of medicine.

EXERCISE:

A few books you may wish to explore relative to this topic are:

Halftime by Bob Buford
Replace Retirement by John Anderson
Abundance by Peter Diamandis
Younger Next Year by Chris Crowley

Also consider taking the online Real Age Test to see how biologically youthful you are today.

“God gave us our memories so that we might have roses in December.”

“God gave us our memories so that we might have roses in December.”

—James M. Barrie, 19th Century Scottish author of Peter Pan

Image from Unsplash by Debby Hudson

It is February, and Michigan is in the grip of winter. The blooming flowers of spring and summer are months away. For many, the weather can be physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually draining, making it feel that a good bit of our “get up and go” has gotten up and gone.

Our minds can, in such situations, operate as time machines, in which we experience some of those sunny days in which our lives were far rosier.

EXERCISE:

Consider a three-to-five minute daily meditative journey today, and for the rest of the weeks of winter. Reminisce and bask in some of the sunnier days of your past. How can and will you take this energy boosting experience into your day and spread its beauty to those in your personal and professional communities?