Friday Review: Criticism

FRIDAY REVIEW: CRITICISM

How critical are you? How do you react to criticism from others? Here are a few criticism-related posts you may have missed.

 

“Praise does wonders for our sense of hearing.”

 

 

 

 

“If criticism is needed, do it tactfully. Don’t use a sledgehammer when a fly swatter will do the job.”

 

 

 

 

“Dogs bark at those they do not know.”

 

 

 

 

 

“Anyone who keeps the ability to see beauty never grows old.”

“Anyone who keeps the ability to see beauty never grows old.”

—Franz Kafka, 20th Century German-speaking Bohemian novelist

Image from Unsplash by Mitchell Maglio

The phrase Beauty is in the Eye of the Beholder can only take us so far in life. Given the increasing pace of our lives, many of us struggle with even taking the time to perceive and fully appreciate the beauty around and within our world.

Considering beauty as a fountain of youth may cause all of us to take a far more comprehensive look at this skill, much like our current efforts to eat better, exercise more, and get the rest we need to be our best, for ourselves and those we love.

EXERCISE:

Where and in what ways can and will you more fully experience and delight in all the miraculous beauty around and within you?

Hopefully, just the anticipation of doing so will put a lot more youthful pep in your step!

“A surplus of effort could overcome a deficit of confidence.”

“A surplus of effort could overcome a deficit of confidence.”

—Sonia Sotomayor, U.S. Supreme Court Justice

Take a few minutes to reflect on your level of confidence regarding your personal and professional skills, abilities, and talents.

In which areas are you most or least confident?

Examine the levels of effort, practice, and overall experience you have put forth in each of these areas.

What factors seem to be most associated with higher versus lower confidence?

EXERCISE:

Where and on what personal or professional matter would a surplus of effort increase your effectiveness and your confidence?

What actions can and will you take to do just that?

“The next move is yours.”

“The next move is yours.”

—Author Unknown

Image from Unsplash by Robert Coelho

Imagine your life as a board game that involves successfully navigating different frontiers or territories in order to win.

The frontiers are:

  • Optimal health
  • Quality relationships
  • Professional achievement
  • Contributions to your community
  • Spirituality, faith, religion
  • Family
  • Life balance and peace of mind

EXERCISE:

Where are you falling behind, keeping up, or ahead of your current expectation for yourself?

What is your next move in these and other priority areas of your life?

Consider picking up a copy of Seth Godin’s book What to Do When it’s Your Turn to help you see and pursue your next move.

Conflict is essential to progress

“Conflict is essential to progress. No matter how much the engine revs, without friction the wheels cannot move forward.”

—Rob Reinalda, Executive Editor at Lawrence Ragan Communications

Image from Unsplash by Simon English

Here in Michigan, especially around the Detroit area, the Car/SUV/Truck is still king of the road. Toward the end of January, we had a bit of foul, frigid weather, including one particular morning in which my driveway was a sheet of black ice.

Without the expected traction from the driveway, I struggled to make it to my car and barely avoided falling, which was probably a comical sight to neighbors who may have been watching!

EXERCISE:

Where are you experiencing a lack of traction, or feel you are spinning your wheels?

Where do you notice conflict or areas of friction related to an important relationship or project?

How might this gritty or challenging situation actually be the source of friction that helps you move things forward?

Friday Review: Mistakes

FRIDAY REVIEW: MISTAKES

What have you learned from mistakes you have made? Here are a few mistake-related posts you may have missed.

 

“Just because you’ve made mistakes doesn’t mean your mistakes get to make you. Take notice of your inner critic, forgive yourself, and move on.”

 

 

 

“One thorn of experience is worth a whole wilderness of warning.”

 

 

 

 

“We should learn from the mistakes of others. We don’t have time to make them all ourselves.”

 

 

 

“Let no one keep you from your journey.”

“Let no one keep you from your journey.”

—Mark Nepo, American poet and spiritual adviser

Image from Unsplash by Clemens van Lay

Where are you headed today, this week, this year?

What are your short and long term goals and objectives, personally and professionally?

Toward the start of each year, questions like these are asked so frequently that we often drown them out much like the safety instructions before a flight.

What if we now answered these questions on a far deeper level than at any other time in our lives?

What are your answers? If they don’t ignite a spark or engulf you in flames of passion and excitement, you’ve got more work to do and could perhaps use the support of a coach, mentor, close colleague, or family member.

EXERCISE:

What could possibly stop you from pursuing and fully realizing what you deeply desire?

How will you prevent anyone – including yourself – from keeping you from your journey?

Consider looking up Mark Nepo and exploring his work more fully.

“The greatest threat to our planet is the belief that someone else will save it.”

“The greatest threat to our planet is the belief that someone else will save it.”

—Robert Swan, OBE, FRGS—first person to walk to both Poles

Image from Unsplash by The New York Public Library

How are you personally coming to the rescue of planet Earth?

How aware are you of the significant impact we have on our beautiful world?

In the business world, we look at adding more revenue through various channels, making wise and progressive investments, and of course, we conserve resources and reduce waste wherever possible.

What if Earth was a business and all people, all organizations, and all nations became optimal stewards of the planet, so that Earth could truly be, as Jim Collins said, Built to Last?

EXERCISE:

How are you currently acting as a loyal and caring steward to our planet? In what new and expanded ways can and will you take greater responsibility and accountability to safeguard our collective home?

“Lovely days don’t come to you. You should walk to them.”

“Lovely days don’t come to you. You should walk to them.”

—Jalāl ad-Dīn Rūmī, 13th-century Persian poet

Image from Unsplash by Bob Canning

The term snowbird was first applied to humans in the early 1900s, to describe northern laborers who flocked down south to work as the cold, harsh winter set in up north.

Today, northerners of all kinds – including vacationers and retirees – are migrating south as the first frost arrives, to experience more lovely warm days.

Rumi surely wasn’t referring only to the weather. Perhaps he wanted all of us to look around – and deeper within – to determine exactly what a lovely day means, and just how much influence we have to create our own weather, wherever we happen to be.

EXERCISE:

What are some additional ways you can use your mental, physical, emotional, and spiritual energies to walk or even run toward far more lovely days in the future?

“People can’t jump on your bandwagon if it’s parked in the garage.”

“People can’t jump on your bandwagon if it’s parked in the garage.”

—Sam Horn, Intrigue Expert, Author, Communications Strategist

Image by Freekee, in the Public Domain

The term bandwagon first appeared in a book about P.T. Barnum, the famous circus promoter.

Back in the 1850s, a circus made a showy parade through town before they set up. The bright and ornamental wagons were always part of the parade, meant to attract villagers. Musicians were always included, so their arrival could be heard and seen for considerable distances.

What ideas, causes, missions, or purposes do you wish to share with the villagers in your personal and professional communities?

What are you currently doing to broadcast your energy and excitement so that others will climb aboard and join your parade?

EXERCISE:

Where are you still in the garage with your idea and vision? How can and will you strike up the band so that others can jump aboard?