Friday Review: Persuasion

FRIDAY REVIEW: PERSUASION

Who are the most persuasive people you know? Here are a few persuasion-related post you may have missed.

 

“One of the best ways to persuade others is with your ears – by listening to them.”

 

 

 

“Your smile is your logo. Your personality is your business card. How you leave others feeling after having an experience with you becomes your trademark.”

 

 

 

“We are generally the better persuaded by the reasons we discover ourselves than by those given to us by others.”

 

 

“The inner life of any great thing will be incomprehensible to me until I develop and deepen an inner life of my own.”

“The inner life of any great thing will be incomprehensible to me until I develop and deepen an inner life of my own.”

—Parker J Palmer, Founder/Sr. Partner Emeritus, Center for Courage & Renewal

Image from Unsplash by Content Pixie

Examine all the greatness you see around you.

Who are the great people? Beyond the people, where are the places and things in your world that you consider extraordinary and wonderful?

If your list is very long, Parker Palmer would probably applaud you for doing the important and often difficult work of personal inquiry and introspection. By doing this inner work and seeing more deeply into our hearts, minds, and souls, we can find our own greatness and thus recognize it when we look to the outer world.

EXERCISE:

How and in what ways can and will you examine and reflect more deeply on your inner world to discover new levels of your own greatness?

With this increased awareness and clarity, look again and again at the people, places, and things around you, to embrace and delight in your wondrous world.

Please reply to this post and let me know what you discover!

 

“Don’t set your heart on so many things.”

“Don’t set your heart on so many things.”

—Epictetus, ancient Greek Philosopher

Image from Unsplash by Luis Villasmil

Our hearts can be a bit like our hands — they can only grasp and hold so much.

The media keeps telling us the lie, “You Can Have it All!”

Many who pursue the never-ending journey of MORE eventually consume their lives in a frantic race, rarely feeling extended periods of satisfaction, contentment, and peace of mind.

I love the idea that the best things in life are not things. Traveling lighter with what fills our hearts and nurtures our souls seems far wiser council.

EXERCISE:

If your heart is a bit heavy these days or if what you have is not fully satisfying, try a bit of physical, mental, and emotional uncluttering. Please reply to this post to let me know what you discover about your heart’s true desires.

“Love, like the ocean, continues beyond the horizon. And life, like the sun, shines where we cannot see.”

“Love, like the ocean, continues beyond the horizon. And life, like the sun, shines where we cannot see.”

—Author Unknown

Image from Unsplash by Aaron Doucett

A friend and client named Doug sent me today’s quote in a condolence card upon the passing of my father, Marvin, in early March.

Since my dad’s passing after a remarkable 94 years, I have noticed many significant signs that it was only his body that died. His spirit and soul are still very present beyond the horizon we can see with our mortal capacities.

As I was preparing my breakfast the day after Dad died, I looked out the window and saw a cardinal.

I’ve been told that when God sends a cardinal, it’s a visitor from heaven. Cardinals appear when loved ones are near. When you keep seeing a certain type of bird, it is usually a heaven-sent messenger of love for you. `

EXERCISE:

Take some time today to reflect on some of the important people in your life who have passed away. Note examples of how they continue to shine and show their love in your life.

Please reply to this post if you wish to share your own perspective and experiences.

“A defining moment is a short experience that is both memorable and meaningful.”

“A defining moment is a short experience that is both memorable and meaningful.”

—Chip & Dan Heath, The Power of Moments

Image from Unsplash by Charisse Kenion

I’d like to take you on a trip back in time.

After you read this post, close your eyes and reflect back on your life. Go back as far as you can to those memorable and meaningful moments, starting with your days as a child and all the way up to today. Take your time and visualize yourself and those who shared the moments with you.

Exploring old photo albums, yearbooks, and social media images and posts can expand your recollections.

Which events do you consider to be of greatest significance? What are the defining moments that shaped your values, beliefs, and character to have you become the person you are today?

EXERCISE:

How can and will you more consciously capture and appreciate more memorable and meaningful moments as you head into the days, weeks, and years that lie ahead?

Friday Review: Setbacks

FRIDAY REVIEW: SETBACKS

We all experience setbacks now and then. Here are a few setback-related posts you may have missed. Click to read the full message.

“Temporary setbacks boost your skill to open locks with previously unknown combinations.”

 

 

 

“Their ‘Can’t’ is my trumpet.”

 

 

 

 

 

“The darkest nights produce the brightest stars.”
 

 

 

“The reality of where you are is always more important than the ideal of where you imagine you should be.”

“The reality of where you are is always more important than the ideal of where you imagine you should be.”

Jeff Warren, Canadian author and meditation teacher

Image from Unsplash by Alejandro Piñero Amerio

For the past few months, I have added Calm’s daily trip to my meditation practice. Jeff Warren, the author and narrator of these ten-minute segments, put the practice of meditation and mindfulness into an edgy and contemporary perspective, which I find novel and engaging.

Today’s quote is satisfying and reassuring. It reminds me to more fully appreciate where I am and what I have. This feeling and knowing helps in my happiness efforts and expands my capacity for gratitude.

EXERCISE:

How would embracing the idea that “someday” is not actually a day of the week help you live more fully today? Let’s not get ahead of ourselves — we might miss something very important.

 

“Be frugal and generous.”

“Be frugal and generous.”

—Laszlo Bock, author of Work Rules

Image from Amazon

The pandemic and its economic repercussions have caused many a family and business to tighten their belts. Being mindful of diminishing or scarce resources has created levels of frugality not seen since the Great Depression.

At the same time, this shared experience has spurred many to extraordinary acts of generosity and selflessness to support those in need.

What examples of frugality and generosity have you observed in your personal and professional communities? Where have you been both frugal and generous at the same time?

EXERCISE:

What life lessons have you learned this past year regarding the virtues of frugality and generosity?

Please reply to this post to share your own stories and insights.

“What was the key takeaway from the specific situation?”

“What was the key takeaway from the specific situation?”

—U.S. Dept. of Veteran Affairs: 100 Sample Interview Questions

Image from Unsplash by Gigi

Of all the tools in a coach’s toolbox, none gets used more often than powerful questions. Open-ended question — those that begin with who, what, where, when, why, and how — are very handy in establishing and deepening relationships for the rest of us as well.

Today’s quote is commonly used by seasoned interviewers when evaluating candidates for various job opportunities. This question seeks to determine the applicant’s openness and receptivity to various inputs and types of feedback from significant experiences and events in their past.

EXERCISE:

How can and will you use today’s question to squeeze more teachable moments out of your communities? Please be sure to ask and answer the question yourself, to act as your own coach.

 

“Anything we are doing, we can do better.”

“Anything we are doing, we can do better.”

—Google’s Operating Assumption

mage from Unsplash by Markus Winkler

Each year for the past decade I have reviewed the book, Your Best Year Yet by Jinny Ditzler. One of its many exercises is to list all the roles you currently play in your personal and professional communities. The exercise then challenges you to determine your intentions for each role in the year ahead.

Taking time to examine our efforts and progress in the previous year shines a spotlight on our capacity, willingness, and promise to do and be better.

EXERCISE:

Given this year is well underway, how can and will you “spring” forward with greater intention, focus, and effort to improve in at least one area of your choosing?