“When your past calls, don’t answer. It has nothing to say.”

“When your past calls, don’t answer. It has nothing to say.”

—Author Unknown

Image from Unsplash by Hadija Saidi

Or maybe it does.

Most of us have had the experience of meeting with an old friend or former schoolmate, in which the stories and discussions reoccur like Groundhog Day. It’s like a record that keeps skipping back to play the same old tunes.

In such situations, we often tune things out and feel our lives wasting away because we’ve already been there and done that.

Alternatively, what if the lessons of the past were never fully learned and they present themselves again, hoping you have new lenses to see what you may have missed on the first, second, or third go-around?

Discovering what’s new might actually be more up to you than what appears frozen in time.

EXERCISE:

What would be the value of not always using your caller ID when you see a call from your past? How might you listen differently to discover new value in their messages?

 

“Today, what did I do for my mind? My body? My spirit? My Relationships? My Creativity, Passion, and those I love?”

“Today, what did I do for my mind? My body? My spirit? My Relationships? My Creativity, Passion, and those I love?”

—Author Unknown

Image from Unsplash by Dayne Topkin

Today’s quote should probably be read twice a day for at least a month. Reviewing it at night will provide a pause for self-reflection. Reading it early in the day can help you better focus your intentions to better support and serve yourself and others.

Just like strength and resistance training works better with multiple sets, this twice-a-day reflective exercise might be a great routine to make into a daily practice.

EXERCISE:

Take out a notebook or journal to answer the questions in today’s quote every day for at least a week. Consider adding another set to this exercise by sharing your answers with a family member, friend, colleague, and perhaps your coach.

“Don’t do hard things alone.”

“Don’t do hard things alone.”

—Author Unknown

Image from Unsplash by Martin Péchy

Wendy and I are in the process of doing a very hard thing. We’re moving from Michigan, our home for 34 years, back to Pennsylvania, to be close to family and friends.

This decision came about due to several factors, including my capacity to coach from anywhere with a solid Wi-Fi signal.

We have so many people to thank and are quite clear that trying to list them all by name would surely leave a few out, so here is the general list of the villagers who came to our rescue:

Family – especially our children Contractors
Friends Storage Unit Professionals
Realtors Movers
Financial Advisors Home Buyers and Sellers
Lawyers Coaches and Mentors

EXERCISE:

Where have you — or where are you — in the process of doing something hard?

Who are the people to thank or request additional aide to pull off the monumental moves in your life?

 

Friday Review: Reflection

FRIDAY REVIEW: REFLECTION

How often do you step outside your routine just to reflect on your life? Here are a few reflection-related posts you may have missed.

 

“I have always tried to make room for anything that wanted to come to me from within.”

 

 

 

 

“Respect yourself enough to walk away from anything that no longer serves you, grows you, or makes you happy.”

 

 

 

 

“Don’t worry so much about knowing the right people. Just make yourself worth knowing.”

 

 

 

“Begin at once to live, and count each separate day as a separate life.

“Begin at once to live, and count each separate day as a separate life.”

—Seneca The Younger, ancient Roman Stoic philosopher and statesman

Image from Unsplash by Erik Karits

How old are you?  If you have a dog or cat, how old are they?  How would you live your life if you knew that each day would cost you seven?

What would life look like if each and every day were lived as if it were a lifetime?

The mayfly has the shortest lifespan on earth — 24 hours or less.  They probably don’t waste a single second.

EXERCISE:

365.1825. 3650. 7300. These are the number of days in one, five, ten, and twenty years.

What can and will you do with each of those daily lifetimes ahead?

“Don’t forget how badly you once wanted what you have now.”

“Don’t forget how badly you once wanted what you have now.”

—Author Unknown

Image from Unsplash by Ismael Paramo

How satisfied are you with your life? Examine who you are on the inside and take a look on the outside to explore your intrinsic and extrinsic accomplishments.

How do your observations compare to the answers you would have offered from 5, 10, or even 20 years ago?

Which of your efforts — based on what you wanted — have come to fruition, and how pleased are you today?

EXERCISE:

Take the time today to count your many blessings. How rich do you feel?

Consider having a conversation with a friend, family member, or colleague to expand the value of this exercise to more fully appreciate how far you have come.

“You don’t need a new year or the new day to start over. You only need a new mindset.”

“You don’t need a new year or the new day to start over. You only need a new mindset.”

—Hazel Hira Özbek, poet & musician

Image from Unsplash by Elena Koycheva

In his 2018 book When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing, Dan Pink does a solid job pointing to a variety of scientifically proven insights about how to live, work, and succeed.

With the stumbles, delays, and stops presented by COVID over the past year, many of us are looking for a fresh start, to get back on track with various personal and professional priorities.

EXERCISE:

Consider reading Dan’s book or check out one the many strong YouTube video summaries. Look beneath the many insights from his research and see for yourself where and when your mindset plays an important role in choosing to take on a new activity or task.

 

“There is nothing like returning to a place that remains unchanged to find the ways in which you yourself have altered.”

“There is nothing like returning to a place that remains unchanged to find the ways in which you yourself have altered.”

—Nelson Mandela, late S. African political leader and philanthropist

Image from Unsplash by Meg Boulden

Last month Wendy and I had dinner with a long-lost friend — Mitchell, and his wife Terry. Mitchell and I were schoolmates from first grade through high school.

Although many of the stories we held from so long ago have not changed, we found great pleasure exploring how we have both grown and altered in pursuing our individual paths.

Our discussion reminded me of visiting my grade school and former teachers when I was a college freshman. I was amazed at how small the desks, hallways, and students were.

EXERCISE:

Select and read one of your favorite books from your youth. Note your thoughts, feelings, and emotions regarding how you have growth and altered into the person you are today.

“Keep on going, and the chances are that you will stumble on something, perhaps when you least expect it. I never heard of anyone ever stumbling on something sitting down.”

“Keep on going, and the chances are that you will stumble on something, perhaps when you least expect it. I never heard of anyone ever stumbling on something sitting down.”

—Charles F. Kettering, 20th Century American inventor and engineer

Image from Unsplash by Jose Aljovin

The average inventor produces about three patents in their lifetime. A prolific inventor produces around 15. Charles Kettering, who founded Delco and worked for General Motors from 1920 to 1947, was the holder of 186 patents.

He was clearly a person of action, not one to sit things out on the sidelines.

Another one of my favorite quotes from Kettering is:

“My Interest is in the future because I am going to spend the rest of my life there.”

EXERCISE:

Where are you currently stopped in your life?

Where are you sitting it out, hoping that things will miraculously improve on their own?

Where is it time to stand up and get going again so that you can stumble on something that will add greater meaning and satisfaction to your life?