“When you decide to collect experiences rather than things, you never run out of storage space.”

“When you decide to collect experiences rather than things, you never run out of storage space.”

—Joshua Becker, Founder and editor of Becoming Minimalist

Image from Unsplash by Chuttersnap

Did you know that the self-storage industry generates revenue of 38 billion dollars annually and that almost 10 percent of households use them? Many also have basements and garages full of stored items.

The volume of self-storage units in the United States alone could fill the Hoover Dam with old clothes, skis, and keepsakes more than 26 times.

Beyond the costs, consider the maintenance and generalized stress caused by the clutter and junk most of us would never pay for again if given the chance.

EXERCISE:

What are some strategies to lighten your load to live a simpler and perhaps more minimalist lifestyle? At the same time, what are a few life experiences you wish to collect that may only take up space on your camera or computer hard drive? What actions will you take today to make progress in both areas?

“What would happen if you doubled down on service?”

“What would happen if you doubled down on service?”

—Robert Richman, keynote speaker and culture architect

Image from Unsplash by Square

Did you know that it takes 5-7 times the effort and resources to obtain new customers than to keep existing customers?

With this statistic in mind, how much effort have you and your organization focused on new customer acquisition rather than making sure your current customers are delighted with you, your products, and of course, your level of service?

Customer loyalty is worth billions, however, we often slack off on our best behaviors once we close the deal. Much like when we say our “I Do” to our life partners. Given the divorce rate of about 50%, we all can see the need to maintain and more appropriately improve these relationships if they are to prosper.

EXERCISE:

What are some ways you can and will double down on your levels of service in your professional and personal communities? What would be the value of the loyalty generated?

“What is the problem that you are the answer to?”

“What is the problem that you are the answer to?”

—Author Unknown

Image from Unsplash by Hans-Peter Gauster

Consider all the roles and responsibilities you have in a typical day. How is it that you create value in your professional and personal communities?

Which of these efforts create the greatest intrinsic and extrinsic value for others and at the same time bring the greatest joy and life satisfaction to you?

Consider the overlapping of these areas as your personal and professional brand or niche. How much of your day do you expend in these efforts versus those that feel like an obligation or burden?

EXERCISE:

What are your special talents and unique abilities that light you up and solve meaningful problems in the world?

How might you realign your daily efforts to spend far more of your precious time doing what you were meant to do?

“Everybody Matters.”

“Everybody Matters.”

—Bob Chapman, founder of Truly Human Leadership

Where do you stand on the two words of today’s quote?

More specifically, where do you stand as it relates to the following communities:

  • Family
  • Neighborhood
  • Your organization or place of employment
  • Your city, state, country
  • The upcoming 2020 census
  • The world and all global citizens
  • The plants and animals that share our earth

As a boy, I attended Creighton Elementary School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. One of my fellow students was Kim Sledge of the singing group, Sister Sledge, who became pretty famous for their hit song, “We are Family.”

EXERCISE:

Where can and will an “everybody matters” family approach to your various communities improve your world? What difference could this make to improve our planet if we all treated each other this way?

Consider checking out Bob Chapman’s book, Everybody Matters: The Extraordinary Power of Caring for Your People like Family.

 

Friday Review of Posts on Effort

FRIDAY REVIEW: EFFORT

Where do you put your strongest efforts in life? Here are a few effort-related posts you may have missed. Click the links to read the messages.

 

“The highest reward for a person’s toil is not what they get for it, but what they become by it.”

 

 

 

“The price of anything is the amount of life you exchange for it.”

 

 

 

“Weeds are flowers too, once you get to know them.”

 

 

 

 

“A man may learn wisdom even from a foe.”

“A man may learn wisdom even from a foe.”

—Aristophanes, 4th Century BC Greek Playwright

Image from India Today

Take a look at this list of famous foes:

  • Batman / The Joker
  • Superman / Lex Luthor
  • Professor X / Magneto
  • Spiderman / The Green Goblin
  • Harry Potter / Voldemort

In the business world, consider the following pairs:

  • Coke / Pepsi
  • Ford / GM
  • Thomas Edison / Nikola Tesla
  • Bill Gates / Steve Jobs
  • Marvel Comics / D.C.

What other famous adversarial pairs can you think of? What potential positive benefits have been brought forth due to the considerable challenges faced on the battlefield – both imaginary and real?

EXERCISE:

Who do you consider your foe? How and in what ways may they be providing you wise lessons you often overlook?

“The world is loud and crowded.”

“The world is loud and crowded.”

—Author Unknown

Image from Unsplash by Teun Swagerman

Recently, I watched a Netflix program called “The Worlds Busiest Cities.” I was amazed by what it is like to live and work in these loud and crowded hubs of humanity.

Given the seemingly relentless pace and overall stresses experienced by many, I found myself saying that I could never live in places such as these.

I’ve often shared the adage, “I spent a week in New York one day” to describe my experience of one of the busiest cities in the United States.

Although many of us live in much smaller communities, our lives are considerably louder and more crowded than in the past, due to smart phones, social media, and our 24/7 society that seemingly never stops.

EXERCISE:

What sanity-enhancing strategies can you bring into your world to provide more wiggle room and lower the volume of life?

Friday Review of posts on Dreams

FRIDAY REVIEW: DREAMS

What do you dream or daydream about? Here are a few dream-related posts you may have missed. Click the links to read the messages.

 

“Nothing happens unless first a dream.”

 

 

 

 

“Dream big, but allow yourself the opportunity to start small and have your share of struggles in the beginning. The world’s greatest composers weren’t writing symphonies the day they first sat at the piano.”

 

 

“Throw your heart over the fence and the rest will follow.”

 

 

 

 

“Turn in the direction of the skid.”

“Turn in the direction of the skid.”

—Driving School adage

Image from Unsplash by Meghan Schiereck

Having lived in Michigan over half my life, I’ve experienced my share of icy roads! Before front or four-wheel drive, traction control, and the latest in snow tire technology, today’s quote was the best advice and coaching to avoid or minimize accidents.

How do you try to control the many aspects of your life? How fast are you going these days? How many icy patches are you experiencing on your personal and professional roads through life?

It turns out the more we slam on the brakes and over-steer, the worse things become.

EXERCISE:

Where is it appropriate for you to fully embrace an icy patch or two in your world? How can you calmly turn into these skids to get back on the road to a better life?

“Do not plan for ventures before finishing what is at hand.”

“Do not plan for ventures before finishing what is at hand.”

—Euripides, Ancient Greek Tragedian

Where are you getting ahead of yourself these days? Where might your impatience, a shiny object or the next interesting diversion cause you to take your eyes off the people, projects, or other priorities of the moment?

There is a wise saying that goes: “If you try to chase two rabbits, both will get away.” How many rabbits are you chasing in your professional and personal worlds? How many new ones come into view on what seems like a daily basis?

EXERCISE

Where would taking the “A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush” approach help you tackle a significant priority before you venture forth toward other matters?