“Few is the number who think with their own minds and feel with their own hearts.”

“Few is the number who think with their own minds and feel with their own hearts.”

—Albert Einstein

Image from Unsplash by Nathan Dumlao

How are you and the people in your personal and professional communities doing relative to today’s quote?

With far more time on our hands due to social and physical distancing, I’ve observed a lot of people thinking and feeling more deeply than ever before.

When – perhaps in the past – have you gone along with the crowd instead of trusting your own heart and head before making an important decision, or taking a significant action?

How has the world grinding to a halt versus the frenetic pace we usually keep given you greater clarity on life?

EXERCISE:

How can and will you use the lessons from these challenging times to help you count yourself among the “few more” people who think with their own minds and feel with their own hearts?

Please reply to this post with whatever thoughts and feelings you care to share.

“Perhaps the truth depends on a walk around the lake.”

“Perhaps the truth depends on a walk around the lake.”

—Wallace Stevens, 20th Century American modernist poet

Image from Unsplash by Greeshma Gangadharan

In recent months, I’ve had considerably more time to think. My daily routines have changed a bit with my health club closing, and working from home.

Instead of my normal fitness efforts I have introduced a 50-minute walk. Although it is not around a lake, it allows for significant, peaceful contemplative time.

Although I am getting plenty of steps and fresh air, of greater interest and value seems to be my mental, emotional, and spiritual explorations. Taking this time to look far more closely and clearly at the truths of my life and our world has been profound.

EXERCISE:

Consider taking a walk around your own lake or neighborhood and see what truths are revealed. Feel free to reply to this post and let me know what you discover.

“Common sense is the collection of prejudices acquired by age eighteen.”

“Common sense is the collection of prejudices acquired by age eighteen.”

—Albert Einstein

Image of Albert Einstein from Public Domain

When we think of great minds, few people top the list more often than Albert Einstein.

If you investigate his life through a wide variety of sources, you will see that he was fond of what he called “thought experiments.”

I guess you could say that he thought a lot about thinking!

What about your own mind?

How much do you think about your own thoughts and how they influence your view of others and life in general?

What prejudices, biases, mental models, and paradigms have you ingrained that support and in many cases limit what’s possible for you?

EXERCISE:

How can and will you conduct some of your own expanded thought experiments to realize a less common and more extraordinary life?

“Learning how to think really means learning how to exercise some control over how and what you think.”

“Learning how to think really means learning how to exercise some control over how and what you think.”

—David Foster Wallace, late American writer and university professor

Image from Unsplash by Thought Catalog

In late January, we reached our 2,000th Quotable Coach post, which represents eight years of Monday-thru-Friday posts to you, our loyal readers.

Beyond making these nuggets of wisdom available to others, this daily exercise is part of my own cerebral workout for my mental muscles.

Posing a wide variety of questions to you (and to myself) has increased my self-awareness and ability to guide my life professionally and personally for the better.

Thank You!

EXERCISE:

In the weeks and months ahead, please consider replying to at least one post that assists you in your own thinking efforts.

A weekly reply would be great!

Please also consider sharing The Quotable Coach resource with others in your communities who might also wish to exercise greater control over how and what they think.

“There is a difference between knowing the path and walking the path.”

“There is a difference between knowing the path and walking the path.”

—Morpheus, portrayed by Lawrence Fishburne in The Matrix

Image of Morpheus from Wikipedia

Morpheus was the Greek god of dreams. The Greek work “morphe” translates to “form” in English. Morpheus is, according to legend, the god who shapes and forms our dreams.

Although most people dream, for some reason many of us seem to forget them, including the insights they may provide, when we wake.

One strategy to consider is to keep a notepad near your bedside to fully capture the ideas and insights you wish to act upon.

EXERCISE:

What insight, dream, or priority matters are you still “in the think” about? When will you begin taking action to walk the path to realize your dream?

“Being able to think about how you think, is a sign of higher intelligence.”

“Being able to think about how you think, is a sign of higher intelligence.”

—Author Unknown

Image from Unsplash by Jordan Whitfield

When was the last time you changed your mind and reconsidered your point of view?

How often do you find yourself frustrated by others because of their stubbornness or being set in their ways of thinking?

If you are brutally honest, you may quickly see that our paradigms, mental models, and biases run deep. We rarely stray from the path worn by many years of experience.

Today’s quote suggests that we can all exercise our thinking muscle and think about thinking to build the important capacity to improve our lives and better our world. We may also add a few more IQ and EQ points by doing so.

EXERCISE:

Feel free to respond to this post with tools or strategies you use to exercise your own thinking muscle. Consider picking up a copy of my book, The Quotable Coach – Daily Nuggets of Practical Wisdom, to explore 365 thinking exercises to use over the next 12 months.

“Not all things are to be discovered. Many are better concealed.”

“Not all things are to be discovered. Many are better concealed.”

—Sophocles, 4th Century BC Greek Writer

Image from Unsplash by Mohamadreza Ashdari

Before you speak: T.H.I.N.K.

T: Is what you are about to say TRUE?
H: Is what you plan to say HELPFUL?
I: Will what you say IMPROVE the situation?
N: Is saying it NECESSARY?
K: Is it KIND?

EXERCISE:

How would your professional and personal relationships improve if you did more thinking before you spoke? Where would more silence and concealing your inner voice be the best approach to take with selected individuals? What other aspects of your life would be better off concealed?

Friday Review of Posts on Thinking

FRIDAY REVIEW: THINKING

How often do you think about the way you (or others) think? Here are a few thinking-related posts you may have missed. Click the links to read the full messages.

 

“The ability to perceive or think differently is more important than the knowledge gained.”

 

 

 

“Great minds like a think.”

 

 

 

 

“If you see the world in black and white, you’re missing important grey matter.”

 

 

 

The method of the enterprising

“The method of the enterprising is to plan with audacity and execute with vigor.”

—Christian Bovee, 19th Century New York City writer

Image from Unsplash by Simeon Jacobson

To what degree are you a “Go for it” person?

When you put on your thinking cap, how creative and bold are your ideas and plans?

Once your strategies and tactics are formulated, how inspired, energized, and motivated are you and those around you to execute them with passion and purpose?

EXERCISE:

Where and on what personal or professional priority would a far more enterprising approach be what is needed to achieve a more audacious outcome?

Fools Live to Regret Their Words

“Fools live to regret their words, wise men to regret their silence.”

—Will Henry, 20th Century American Screenwriter

Image of a boy screaming into a microphone

Image from Unsplash by Jason Rosewell

Through the process of coaching, most people become far more aware and mindful of their thoughts, feelings, and emotions.

Too often, we see foolish individuals blurting out whatever comes to mind to make their point, exert power, diminish others, or just be “right” on whatever the subject.

Wise and perhaps more thoughtful individuals sometimes remain silent on matters of importance with the all-too-frequent statement, “I should have said something,” when their inner voices urged them to do so.

EXERCISE:

Where, when and on what subjects is speaking up or remaining silent the right and wise thing to do?