“Some people drink from the fountain of knowledge, others just gargle.”

“Some people drink from the fountain of knowledge, others just gargle.”

– Robert Anthony, PhD and Hypnotherapist

Photo from Flickr by Martina Yach

Photo from Flickr by Martina Yach

During coaching sessions, I often refer to the reasonably extensive collection of books in my office.

I highlight, underline, and do a good bit of writing throughout the pages of these books, to enhance my ingestion and digestion of these nuggets of knowledge.

For me, a good book is not only an investment of $20, it is an investment of many hours of my life. It is time in which I intend to embrace the considerable value each author hoped to share with readers such as myself.

EXERCISE:

Notice where you drink and/or gargle from the fountain of knowledge. What small or large adjustments can you make to these efforts to impact your life for the better?

Pay particular attention today to your engagement with all forms of information, including everything from the great works of fiction and non-fiction to the wide variety of social media choices available.

“Knowledge is like climbing a mountain; the higher you reach, the more you can see and appreciate.”

“Knowledge is like climbing a mountain; the higher you reach, the more you can see and appreciate.”

– Unknown

484Image from Flickr by kiszka king

When I first read this quote, I immediately wanted to change the word “knowledge” to “wisdom.” After all, most of us have images of wise prophets and sages living on mountaintops, bequeathing us mere mortals below with the wisdom of the ages. However, the pursuit and acquisition of knowledge is still part of the process.

Exercise:

Consider replying with your definitions of “knowledge” and “wisdom,” and how they are related.

What new sights have you been able to see and appreciate during your climb to the top?

“The ability to perceive or think differently is more important than the knowledge gained.”

“The ability to perceive or think differently is more important than the knowledge gained.”

– David Bohm, theoretical physicist


On / off, right / wrong, black / white are examples of polar opposites or, some might say, the duality of a situation. Knowledge, although highly prized and valuable in our world, often points us in the direction of the “right answer” and can often lead us to a somewhat limited view on a particular subject.

Bohm suggests that being open to various perspectives and having the ability to think differently is more important than knowledge in our world today. We need the wisdom to evaluate things with a full spectrum of colors and multiple shades of grey.

Exercise:

Where in your personal and professional life are you limited by knowledge gained and your need to be right? How can you exercise your “try it on” muscle to explore opportunities and possibilities beyond your knowledge of things?