What comes out of you when you are squeezed is what is inside you

“What comes out of you when you are squeezed is what is inside you.”

—Wayne Dyer, late American Self-Help Author and Speaker

image of a rolled up tube of toothpaste

Image from Wikipedia

How many times each day do you brush your teeth to keep your pearly whites pearly white, strengthen your gums, and freshen your breath? Did you know that there are numerous additional uses for toothpaste that can be realized with a few more squeezes? Alternative uses include:

  • Cleaning your hands after cutting smelly foods such as onions
  • Cleaning jewelry
  • Cleaning crayon marks from painted walls
  • Defogging sports eye wear
  • Treating acne and other skin conditions
  • Nail care
  • Removing carpet stains and shower slime

EXERCISE:

Where and how would a few more squeezing situations bring out even more of your unique talents and abilities? How would a bit more squeezing bring out more of the best in others in your personal and professional communities?

Don’t be in such a rush unless you’ve got the time

“Don’t be in such a rush unless you’ve got the time.”

—Author Unknown

Image of a man running across a glass floor

Image from Unsplash by Andy Beales

At my fitness club recently, I was speaking to an automotive executive named Jim about The Quotable Coach series. In addition to showing sincere interest in the concept of quote/coaching commentary/and an exercise to apply the nugget of wisdom to our own lives, he shared today’s quote.

He also told me stories in which rushing had a painful downside – not the least of which was stubbing his baby toe too many times to count.

EXERCISE:

Where and in what ways do you find yourself rushing around your world, with the results you desire falling short of your intentions?

Where would slowing down a bit and taking your time on both important and seemingly urgent matters be the way to approach more aspects of your life?

Friday Review of Posts on Teamwork

FRIDAY REVIEW: TEAMWORK

What are your thoughts and beliefs about teamwork? Here are a few teamwork-related posts you may have missed. Click to read the full message.

 

“Teamwork is the ability to direct individual accomplishment toward organizational objectives. It is the fuel that allows common people to attain uncommon results.”

 

 

 

 

“A single leaf working alone provides no shade.”

 

 

 

 

“Vital to every operation is cooperation.”

 

 

 

 

Just because you can’t keep up doesn’t mean you can’t show up

“Just because you can’t keep up doesn’t mean you can’t show up.”

—Brendon Burchard, High Performance Author

Image of people running on the street

Image from Unsplash by Mārtiņš Zemlickis

Striving for excellence is a powerful thing. It gives us all a sense of passion and purpose that is fundamental to living a happy, fulfilled life. There is, however, a dark side to the pursuit of excellence when we compare ourselves to others that have demonstrated superior skills and abilities.

In such cases, many of us don’t even bother suiting up and showing up to contribute our abilities and capacities for fear of looking bad and not keeping up.

EXERCISE:

Where and on what personal or professional issue is it time to summon the courage to show up and contribute your best, regardless of the outcome?

It pays to keep an open mind, but not so open your brain falls out

“It pays to keep an open mind, but not so open your brain falls out.”

—Carl Sagan, 20th Century American Astronomer

Image from medium.com

Who in your personal or professional life do you consider the most closed minded and stubborn? If you are like many of us, you might say, “Where do I start?” and be able to create a reasonably long list in mere minutes. What are the benefits and down sides of having such a closed-minded view of things?

On the other hand, who are the most open and receptive folks you know? Who are those who will try on the views and perspective of others, easily and fully? What are the benefits, and in the case of today’s quote, the downside of seeing the world primarily through the lens of those around you?

EXERCISE:

Imagine your mind is a screen door or window. How would the flow of air on a summer day be similar to the healthy flow of new ideas with a wider perspective foster more quality relationships and life success?

 

To appreciate the beauty of a snowflake it is necessary to stand out in the cold.

“To appreciate the beauty of a snowflake it is necessary to stand out in the cold.”

—Aristotle

Image of a snowflake on a pine needle

Image from Unsplash by Aaron Burden

For some reason, during winter I like to watch shows about Alaska. Three of my favorites are:
Life Below Zero
Alaska the Last Frontier
The Last Alaskans

What I enjoy the most is just how much each individual experiences joy and pleasure living such a demanding, chilly lifestyle. Beyond the natural beauty and splendor of this vast part of the country is perhaps the fact that they all cherish the ability to lead very self-determined lives.

EXERCISE:

What current and future struggles and life difficulties are you willing to face to pursue your own unique and beautiful life journey?

More people would learn from their mistakes if they weren’t so busy denying them

“More people would learn from their mistakes if they weren’t so busy denying them.”

—Dan Sullivan, founder and president of The Strategic Coach Inc.

Image from DailyCaring

Having a bias for being right and making others wrong seems to be one of the fundamental challenges facing the majority of people throughout history. Although most of us prefer to consider ourselves self-aware and open-minded, we often fall into the trap of seeing the mistakes of others far more often than viewing our own shortcomings.

Instead of closing our eyes to our own responsibilities for certain failures, what if we could shift our perspective from one of embarrassment and shame to one of learning and growth? How would this support the courage it takes to be vulnerable in those moments we fall short in our efforts?

EXERCISE:

Where and on what life issue are you, or perhaps someone you know, in denial about a significant mistake? What would be the benefit if you or they would more frequently embrace the life changing magic and important lessons in such situations?

Friday Review Storytelling

FRIDAY REVIEW: STORYTELLING

What are the stories you tell yourself about yourself? Here are a few storytelling posts you may have missed. Click to read the full message.

 

“The greatest story you will ever tell is your own.”

 

 

 

 

“Stories can conquer fear, you know. They can make the heart bigger.”

 

 

 

“When I look back in five years, which of these options will make the best story?”

 

 

 

 

No problem of human making is too great to be overcome

“No problem of human making is too great to be overcome by human ingenuity, human energy, and the untiring hope of the human spirit.”

—George H.W. Bush, 41st President of the United States

Image of George HW Bush

Image from Huffpost

Do you watch the news and follow current events? If you do, my guess is that you may see the world is in quite a mess, with problems around every corner.

We don’t need to look at just the global, national, or regional events presented to us by the media. We need only look to our own back yards, within our communities and families to see our immediate challenges.

Would you believe me if I told you that there is fact-based evidence that the world as a whole is in many ways far better off than at any other point in human history?

Imagine a media outlet focused exclusively on the power and impact of human ingenuity, energy, and the hopeful efforts of the human spirit.

EXERCISE:

Do some research for yourself into how mankind is actually coming together to solve some of our most pressing problems.

A few books you may consider reading on this subject are:
Abundance by Peter Diamandis
Factfulness by Hans Rosling
Thank You for Being Late by Thomas Friedman

 

Appreciation is a wonderful thing

“Appreciation is a wonderful thing: It makes what is excellent in others belong to us as well.”

—Voltaire, 16th Century French Writer

Image of Voltaire

Image of Voltaire from Wikiquote

Voltaire lived to be eighty-four years old. Considering he was born in 1694, that is practically a miracle, given the poor sanitation levels and lack of healthcare available in Europe at the time.

Perhaps it was his considerable appreciation for the world around him that had him experience life with a sense of greater abundance and awe. With such a healthy and robust view of life, who wouldn’t keep reaching for one more day, and then another?

EXERCISE:

How might you experience and more fully appreciate everything and everyone around you in the coming days? How would such a mindful practice lead you to a richer, more fulfilling life?