How are you living a purposeful life? Playing a supporting role to serve and love others is more than enough.

How are you living a purposeful life? Playing a supporting role to serve and love others is more than enough.

—Calm App Reflection

Image from Unsplash by wocintechchat.com

Without question, living a purposeful life is a high priority for most people.

We all want our lives to matter and contribute in some meaningful way. In our efforts to do so, we often look around at others for examples of making a dent in the universe. Popular media of all types offer examples that for many of us are out of reach—winning gold medals, a Nobel Prize, and solving the world’s most challenging problems are not the only way to leave a legacy.

Today’s quote has us appreciate the everyday acts of service and love we offer our families and communities as being more than enough.

EXERCISE:

Where and how are you playing an important supporting role in the lives of others?

How can you more fully acknowledge your daily acts of love and service as a source of great meaning and purpose?

“In the game of life, there’s no high score list, but you never want to languish on level one.”

“In the game of life, there’s no high score list, but you never want to languish on level one.”

Jay Shetty, life coach and former Hindu monk

Image from Unsplash by Erik Mclean

I’ve never been a big fan of video games. Except for space invaders and PAC Man many years ago, I never seemed to get the rush of leveling up in the multitude of games and systems that came after.

I have, however, always been interested in the game of life and the pursuit of growth and achievement. Tackling some worthy objective that filled my desire to learn and feel purposeful always had me want to take the next steps in my capabilities and impact.

EXERCISE:

Where do you have a keen desire to level up and build on your current abilities?

How can you measure your progress in these areas with your own inner scoreboard?

“If you have a pulse, you have a purpose.”

“If you have a pulse, you have a purpose.”

—Richard Leider, Faculty member of the Modern Elder Academy

Image from Unsplash by Mockup Graphics

Ask yourself the following questions:

  • Am I doing what I love to do?
  • Is what I do helpful to others?
  • Does it energize me or drain me?

Consider modifying these closed questions to open ended questions such as….

  • How often do I get to do what I love?
  • How are my efforts helpful to others?
  • How energized and alive do I feel when engaged in these activities?

EXERCISE:

What are some ways you can and will increase your heart rate to live an even more inspired and purposeful life?

If one does not know to which port one is sailing, no wind is favorable

“If one does not know to which port one is sailing, no wind is favorable.”

—Seneca, ancient Roman philosopher & statesman

Image from Unsplash by Christian Wiediger

What things in life get you excited and stir your passions? What activities and efforts really float your boat?  How fast and how far have these winds taken you personally and professionally?

Sometimes people find themselves adrift in the middle of nowhere without direction. They often feel lost at sea with a sense of queasiness and loneliness without a place to drop anchor. It’s at such times that our passions can be combined with the purpose of a north star to guide us home.

EXERCISE:

Where and how can you more fully combine both passion and purpose in your life to sail confidently and contently into the welcoming harbors of your world?

“The proper work of the mind is the exercise of choice, refusal, yearnings, repulsion, preparation, purpose, and assent.”

“The proper work of the mind is the exercise of choice, refusal, yearnings, repulsion, preparation, purpose, and assent.”

—Epictetus, Discourses

Image from Unsplash by Robina Weermeijer

In today’s quote, Epictetus suggests there are seven clear functions of the mind.

Ryan Holiday and Stephen Hanselman break each of them down in the following manner in their book, The Daily Stoic:

Choice: to do and think right
Refusal: of temptation
Yearning: to be better
Repulsion: of negativity, of bad influences, and what isn’t true
Preparation: for what lies ahead or whatever might happen
Purpose: our guiding principles and highest priorities
Assent: to be free of deception about what is inside and outside our control (and be ready to accept the latter)

EXERCISE:

Consider printing this post out to work on and think through one of these functions of the mind each day. This exercise could be a crash course in Stoicism in itself.

“Why do you get up in the morning?”

“Why do you get up in the morning?”

—Dan Buettner, New York Times-bestselling author

Image from Unsplash by Somnox Sleep

I like to start each day as purposefully as possible to learn and grow, to express gratitude and especially to find ways to serve others.

Writing The Quotable Coach post most mornings over the last nine years is one important expression that meets all of the criteria. Today I am getting up a bit early to go shopping for food for us and a close friend.

What are some of the important reasons you get up each morning? What goals and intentions empower and energize you, make your day special for yourself and others? How will spending your day this way put a smile of satisfaction on your face when you lie down to sleep tonight?

EXERCISE:

Consider exploring the 2200 Quotable Coach posts that are sorted by categories. Please consider sharing this resource with others whom you wish to support and serve in the coming year.

Thank You!

“Follow your heart. Purpose will reveal itself to you only while walking your own path.”

“Follow your heart. Purpose will reveal itself to you only while walking your own path.”

—Brendon Burchard, New York Times best-selling author

Image from Unsplash by Lucas George Wendt

These days, many people are feeling a bit lost.

The proverbial bread crumbs they placed along their life paths have been blown, washed, or burned away by the events and challenges facing us all.

Taking time to look around at reality—and within our hearts—to revisit or discover our foundational values and core life principles is a good place to start.

Doing so will likely reveal various paths you can take and what direction to head. In these moments, it can be enough to step forward in ways that express these values.

Trust your heart that purpose and meaning will meet you on the way.

EXERCISE:

Consider completing the Life Vision Exercise to see what your heart has to say, and pack a few snacks for your purposeful journey.

“It is very sad to me that some people are so intent on leaving their mark on the world that they don’t care if that mark is a scar.”

“It is very sad to me that some people are so intent on leaving their mark on the world that they don’t care if that mark is a scar.”

—John Michael Green, American Author of Looking for Alaska

What constitutes a good day? What are the foundations of a good life? Where do you look when considering such questions?

Luckily, the research on such matters is extensive. Virtually all sources agree that having purpose and making a positive difference in the lives of others is fundamental.

In his book, Give and Take, Adam Grant points to the fact that giving and contributing to others and society provides both intrinsic and extrinsic rewards. The book, The Five Love Languages, points to the ways we and others in our world demonstrate love for each other, through simple daily acts of generosity and care.

EXERCISE:

Where and in what ways can you make an even bigger and more positive mark on your world? How and in what ways can you encourage and support others in your various communities to do the same?

Friday Review: Purpose

FRIDAY REVIEW: PURPOSE

How in tune are you to your own life purpose? Here are a few purpose-related posts you may have missed.

 

“The purpose of life is a life of purpose.”

 

 

 

 

“Don’t ask yourself what the world needs. Ask yourself what makes you come alive, and then go and do that. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.”

 

 

 

“Of all knowledge, the wise and good seek most to know themselves.”

 

 

 

 

“Care and Diligence bring luck.”

“Care and Diligence bring luck.”

—Thomas Fuller, 17th Century English historian

We have all heard the phrase, The harder you work the luckier you get.

A question to consider related to this premise is: What causes some of us to work with such diligence?

Perhaps it is the idea of truly caring for something or someone that brings forth our very best and most determined efforts.

Research stated in Dan Pink’s book, Drive, confirms the importance of purpose and meaning as fundamental to what literally drives us forward.

EXERCISE:

How can you dramatically increase you own luck by bringing forth your most caring and diligent efforts in your personal and professional worlds?