The first step towards getting somewhere

“The first step towards getting somewhere is to decide that you are not going to stay where you are.”

—J. Pierpont Morgan, 19th Century American Banker

Image of a hand with a large bandaid on the palm

Image from Unsplash by Brian Patrick Tagalog

Pain and pleasure are two of the greatest motivators to mobilize us all to take action. Whether it involves jerking our hand away from a hot stove or pursing our dreams, we get going pretty quickly.

For some reason, pain or negative life situations often win the battle over our desires, making less of an undesirable situation preferable to more of a good one.

Whatever your own experience may be on this issue, please look around at your personal and professional worlds to examine where staying where you are is completely unacceptable.

EXERCISE:

Decide today what first step you promise yourself to take to move away from the pain of being stuck where you are, to a better and perhaps more pleasurable future. Consider doing this exercise on a weekly basis and feel free to get back with me regarding your results.

Obstacles in your path

“There are plenty of obstacles in your path. Don’t allow yourself to become one of them.”

—Author Unknown

Image of a locked fence

Image from Unsplash by Jason Blackeye

The TV show, Running Wild with Bear Grylls, comes to mind when I think about today’s quote.

In this show, famed adventurist and survivalist Bear Grylls takes top stars from the entertainment and sports worlds into the most remote and pristine locations in the world for a 48-hour journey of a lifetime.

Cast members face their deepest fears and tackle everything from wild animals to rock rappelling through some of the world’s most unforgiving wilderness.

We all face a wide variety of daily external obstacles that fall short of these life-threatening challenges. We also create many internal challenges that stop us in our tracks, as abruptly as if our lives were on the line.

EXERCISE:

Where are you currently your own worst enemy, or putting up your own internal barriers? What one courageous action can you take today to create a breakthrough in this area?

When your feet start to hurt

“When your feet start to hurt, place yourself in someone else’s shoes.”

—Demi Lovato, American Singer-Songwriter

Image of Factfulness book cover

Image from Amazon.com

I recently finished reading Factfulness by Hans Rosling. The book’s subtitle really grabbed my interest: Ten Reasons We’re Wrong about the World – and Why Things are Better than You Think.

Through the latest socioeconomic data he challenges the reader to find themselves along the continuum of low, middle, and high income countries. What Lovato’s quote suggests is a day walking in the shoes of others when our lives seem so difficult.

The wonderful news is that compared to 20 or 50 years ago, we are phenomenally better off today.

EXERCISE:

Where could putting yourself in other people’s shoes help you be far more satisfied and appreciative of your life?

To learn more, consider checking out Hans Rosling’s TED Talk.

Be yourself and the right people will love you

“Don’t change so people will like you. Be yourself and the right people will love you.”

—Author Unknown

Image of a smart phone showing no signal

Image from Wilson Amplifers

Did you know that in 2016 cell phone usage around the world was estimated at 62.9%? This number is expected to grow to almost 70% by 2019, when more than five billion people will be using them.

The numerous companies fighting for their share of this market all claim the best signals, widest coverage, and fastest speeds to attract more customers.

How often have you found yourself in a dead zone, with dropped calls and few or no bars on your screen? When that happens, most of us simply change our position, driving a bit further until we get back into signal range.

EXERCISE:

Instead of trying to connect with others by changing yourself, how could you boost your own authentic and powerful signal to attract the people who will love you?

Friday Review of Posts on Career

FRIDAY REVIEW: CAREER

Consider your career thus far.  Here are a few career-related posts you may have missed. Click on the links to read the full messages.

 

“It’s a beautiful thing when a career and passion come together.”

 

 

 

“All the arts are apprenticeship. The big art is our life.”

 

 

 

 

“I do not believe you can do today’s job with yesterday’s methods and be in business tomorrow.”

 

 

 

Grow through what you go through

“Grow through what you go through.”

—Author Unknown

Image of a plant coming through cement

Image from Unsplash by Stas Ovsky

Compared to traditional school, life is a paradox. It gives you the test first, before you learn the lesson.

What are some of the most difficult things you have gone through in your life? You know – the things that challenged you physically, mentally, emotionally, and even spiritually?

Take a moment to actually picture yourself before that experience, and look again at your capabilities today.

What time in your life are these memories from? To what degree have you experienced these tests and challenges professionally or personally in the past year?

EXERCISE:

Regardless of whether challenges seem to find you or you initiate your own life-stretching circumstances, how can you more fully acknowledge and appreciate more of these growth opportunities?

One looks back with appreciation

“One looks back with appreciation to the brilliant teachers, but with gratitude to those who touched our human feelings.”

—Carl Gustav Jung, 20th Century Swiss founder of analytical psychology

I recently watched the Netflix documentary, Genius of the Ancient World. The three-part series focused on The Buddha, Socrates, and Confucius.

Surprisingly, they all lived about 2,500 years ago, but worlds apart geographically. Many of their teachings and influences are still very apparent in our world today.

Who are the brilliant and soul-touching teachers from your past? Who are the current teachers and mentors that continue to make a meaningful difference in your life?

Where have you, and are you, that brilliant and perhaps more importantly, soul-touching teacher for others, personally or professionally?

EXERCISE:

Reflect on the questions above, and determine some meaningful way to show your gratitude for the teachers who influenced your world.

The next best thing to being clever

“The next best thing to being clever is being able to quote someone who is.”

—Mary Pettibone Poole, 20th Century Author of aphorisms

In some ways, we are all in the entertainment business. Personally or professionally, it is our intention to bring attention to our important thoughts and ideas.

Over the years of The Quotable Coach series, I’ve encouraged our readers to focus on being interested rather than interesting.

Let’s face it: Sometimes we just want others to be interested in what we have to say. Unfortunately, our thinking is not always as attention-worthy as we think it is.

If we are reasonably well read and informed, we can utilize the originality and clever thinking of others to break through and make the point we deem relevant and important.

EXERCISE:

Where can you share the wisdom and cleverness of others to have the influence and impact you desire?

Please give credit (where credit is due) to the various sources of such cleverness, and they may reciprocate by using a quote from you at some point!

You are allowed to be both

“You are allowed to be both a masterpiece and a work in progress simultaneously.”

—Sophia Bush, American Actress

Image of a child's finger painting next to The Mona Lisa

Are you a life-long learner?

Are you attracted to excellence and personal mastery?

Have you ever explored the biographies and life stories of acclaimed masters such as Benjamin Franklin, Charles Darwin, Leonardo DaVinci, Mozart, and Einstein?

If you have, you may have noticed common patterns and similarities among them. Most notably, they all dedicated their lives to the process of continual learning, growth, and contribution. Occasionally they had masterpiece moments that were recognized by others more than themselves.

My guess is that it was the many twists, turns, and efforts along their passionate journeys that made them so remarkable.

EXERCISE:

In what areas of your life are you most excited about and engaged in, being a work in progress?

What would personal mastery look like in these areas?

What steps can and will you take to make more of your life a masterpiece of living?

Consider reading Robert Greene’s 2012 best-selling book, Mastery, to explore this subject in greater detail.

Friday Review of Beliefs

FRIDAY REVIEW: BELIEFS

How often do you review and reorganize the beliefs you hold? Here are a few belief-related posts you may have missed. Click on the links to read the full messages.

 

“A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices.”

 

 

 

“Sometimes you just need to be reminded: ‘You Got This!’”

 

 

 

 

“The truth you believe in and cling to makes you unavailable to hear anything new.”