Friday Review Connection

Friday Review: Connection

Relationships are all about connection. Here are a few connection-related posts you may have missed. Click the link to read the full message.

 

We build too many walls and not enough bridges.”

 

 

 

 

A friend is a loved one who awakens your life in order to free the wild possibilities within you.”

 

 

 

 

Our days are happier when we give people a bit of our heart rather than a piece of our mind.

 

 

 

Live Simply Love Generously

“Live Simply, Love Generously, Speak Truthfully, Breathe Deeply, Do Your Best. Leave everything else to the powers above you.”

—Author Unknown

Image of a field of red tulips

Life is complicated.

Or is it?

It seems the rules of the game are as long and laborious as the new tax code or other governmental regulations.

Far too often, we find our heads spinning and our spirits crushed by the overwhelming effort to sort through the complexities.

Who doesn’t crave far greater peace of mind, simplicity, and tranquility in our rat-race world?

EXERCISE:

Consider the five fundamental touch points in today’s quote as guides to inform your daily efforts to lead a far happier and satisfying life.

What would be possible if we all did this, and left the rest to the powers above?

Absorb What is Useful

“Absorb what is useful. Discard what is not. Add what is uniquely your own.”

—Bruce Lee, 20th Century American Actor & Martial Artist

Image of a man capturing an idea in a net

Image from TED Ideas

Are you an artist, writer, or creator of some other form of content? If so, be prepared to be ripped off, pick-pocketed, and have your work stolen.

Unless you have been hiding your work under a rock or inside a mattress, you have shared it with others. If it is remarkable, or even just good, others will take it for themselves and hopefully build on it.

Protectionism, including trademarks, copyrights, and patents have their place. But with the world of increasing transparency and information just a click away, it won’t be long before someone reverse engineers or tweaks your ideas and makes them their own for a minute or two.

EXERCISE:

Where and how can you absorb what is useful, discard what is not, and add your own unique ideas to contribute to and stand on the shoulder of those who came before you?

How might you coach and mentor others coming up the ranks, to more intentionally support their development and contribution?

A Lie Can Travel Halfway Around the World

“A lie can travel halfway around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.”

—Charles Spurgeon, 19th Century English Preacher

Image of a hand holding a pair of shoes

Image from Unsplash by Kristian Egelund

Over the past year or so, most of us have become aware of the dramatic increase in “Fake News.” During the 2016 U.S. Presidential election, various news outlets went to considerable lengths to disentangle the outright lies and half truths, and get to the facts.

Unfortunately, on many occasions, the truth seems far less interesting than the fake news. Since all media outlets seek greater attention and higher ratings, the path to the truth can be slow and laborious.

EXERCISE:

Where and on what matters can and will you “lace up” the truth in your personal or professional communities, to bring far greater integrity to the world?

Always Keep Your Eyes Open

“Always keep your eyes open. Keep watching because whatever you see can inspire you.”

—Grace Coddington, Vogue Magazine Creative Director

Image of two eyes next to each other

Image from Unsplash by Soroush Karimi

Over a three day holiday, I binged-watched a Netflix series titled “Natural Curiosities,” with one of my favorite narrators, David Attenborough. I love his accent, his passion for nature, and of course, his enthusiastic curiosity for the vast diversity and miraculous aspects of the animal world.

This series took a far deeper look into many creatures I thought I knew reasonably well, given the science-buff status I’ve given myself over the years.

Looking at many creatures with new eyes and Attenborough’s expanded view and insight inspired, entertained, and educated me for hours.

EXERCISE:

Where can you discover far greater inspiration in your life by widening your perspective, and looking more deeply and carefully at the world around you?

Friday Review: Renewal

Friday Review: Renewal

We all need time to renew. Here are a few renewal-related posts you may have missed. Click the links to read the full message.

 

“The will to win … the will to achieve … goes dry and arid without continual renewal.”

 

 

 

 

“The problem with doing nothing is not knowing when you are finished.”

 

 

 

“The answers you seek never come when the mind is busy. They come when the mind is still, when silence speaks loudest.”

 

 

 

 

A Point of View Can Be a Dangerous Luxury

“A point of view can be a dangerous luxury when substituted for insight and understanding.”

—Marshall McLuhan, 20th Century Canadian Professor

Image of a messy drawer

Image from Unsplash by Ashim D’Silva

Most people generally prefer order to chaos. We tend to like thing organized neatly, whether it be our closets, our files, and in the case of today’s quote, our minds.

When we take in information and experiences, we like to put them into neat piles based on previous knowledge. We categorize them by varying points of view on what is right or wrong, good or bad.

When you hear those around you – or maybe even yourself – saying, “I Know,” it often means they or you have stopped listening or closed their mind to alternative insights and perspectives.

EXERCISE:

With whom and on what issues have you developed a point of view that is holding you back in either your personal or professional communities?

Fools Live to Regret Their Words

“Fools live to regret their words, wise men to regret their silence.”

—Will Henry, 20th Century American Screenwriter

Image of a boy screaming into a microphone

Image from Unsplash by Jason Rosewell

Through the process of coaching, most people become far more aware and mindful of their thoughts, feelings, and emotions.

Too often, we see foolish individuals blurting out whatever comes to mind to make their point, exert power, diminish others, or just be “right” on whatever the subject.

Wise and perhaps more thoughtful individuals sometimes remain silent on matters of importance with the all-too-frequent statement, “I should have said something,” when their inner voices urged them to do so.

EXERCISE:

Where, when and on what subjects is speaking up or remaining silent the right and wise thing to do?

Shovel While the Piles are Small

“Shovel while the piles are small.”

—Eric Allenbaugh, Leadership Consultant

Image of cars buried in snow

Image from The Star.com

Today’s quote reminded me of the last substantial snow storm here in Michigan. It was over a weekend, and my plan was simply to wait until it stopped (which it didn’t) to handle the 10-12 inches of wet, heavy stuff at one time. I thought that would be efficient.

Unfortunately, my snow blower didn’t take well to the blade-clogging mixture of snow and ice and refused to cooperate. The result was considerable heavy lifting to clear my driveway. I didn’t need to go to the gym for my regular workout after that!

EXERCISE:

What personal or professional priorities are piling up on you and creating stress?

Where would tackling these piles while they are small be the best approach to lightening your load?

I Will Love the Light

“I will love the light for it shows me the way, yet I will endure the darkness because it shows me the stars.”

—Og Mandino, 20th Century American Author

Image of a starry sky

Image from Flickr by Kristopher Roller

Every summer when I was young my entire family headed to Camp Indian Lake in the Pocono Mountains of Pennsylvania.

Back then, our trusty flashlights were essential tools for nighttime navigation in finding our way back to our cabins.

On clear nights with virtually no ambient light for miles, we would often turn off our torches to enjoy the spectacle of the night sky, filled with what must have been millions of stars.

The flash lights were only helpful in seeing 50 or so feet ahead. The darkness allowed us to see the light of stars, and perhaps galaxies many light years away.

EXERCISE:

Where would a greater appreciation for both the light and the darkness of life reveal even greater insight into yourself and the world?