Friday Review of posts on Renewal

FRIDAY REVIEW: RENEWAL

What are your strategies for renewing your energy, your sense of self, and regaining balance in your life? Here are a few renewal-related posts you may have missed. Click to read the full message.

“The problem with doing nothing is not knowing when you are finished.”

 

 

 

“The answers you seek never come when the mind is busy. They come when the mind is still, when silence speaks loudest.”

 

 

 

 

“Exhaustion is not a status symbol.”

 

 

 

 

The path of least resistance is what makes rivers run crooked

“The path of least resistance is what makes rivers run crooked.”

—Elbert Hubbard, 19th Century American writer and philosopher

Image of crooked river

Image from Unsplash by Wynand Uys

Looking for short cuts and taking the easy route to success is a common trait in our fast-paced world. I find it quite humorous that when I go to my health club each morning, people are competing for the parking spot closest to the entrance to eliminate a twenty-second walk before their one-hour workout.

It is actually this resistance and the level of challenge in our workouts and in life that supports the greatest growth and achievement toward our personal and professional objectives.

EXERCISE:

Where would Taking the Stairs, Eating That Frog, and a bit more Grit help you move directly toward one of your most important goals? Consider reading one or all of these books.

In every man there is something

“In every man there is something wherein I may learn of him, and in that I am his pupil.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson, 19th Century American essayist and poet

Image of two people talking at a business meeting

Image from Unsplash by raw pixel

There is a wise saying about the fact that we have one mouth and two ears, and should use them proportionately.

For most of us, coaching, teaching, advising, and mentoring others, although with good intentions, plays into the fact that we often prefer to be interesting rather than interested.

Consider yourself an explorer or a miner looking for the gold in “them thar’ hills.” To reap such riches, the only tools you would need would be an open set of eyes, ears, and of course, an open mind.

EXERCISE:

In what area of your life is it far more important to be the pupil rather than the teacher?

What is it that you most wish to learn to support either your personal or professional life?

Who are the specific teachers in your world that hold the wisdom you seek?

The time to relax is when you don’t have time for it

“The time to relax is when you don’t have time for it.”

—Sydney J. Harris, 20th Century American Journalist

Image of a man floating in water and reading a book

Image from Unsplash by Toa Heftier

Time is a funny thing. Among the priority topics in a coaching relationship it usually is in the top three to five items people wish to impact.

Billions are spent each year on all sorts of books, blogs, workshops, webinars, and seminars to help us all manage this elusive and seemingly scarce resource.

You are welcome to download my free workbook, Time Management Strategies and Tactics. Enter the password “BarryDemp” when prompted.

The reason for all this attention is that there is simply too many “to do’s” for the time available. We have all experienced being drained, as if we were a smart phone battery needing a recharge.

EXERCISE:

How can and will you allocate some of your precious time for relaxation and renewal of your physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual energies?

Please consider replying to this post regarding the actions you take and the difference it makes.

 

A single sunbeam is enough to drive away many shadows

“A single sunbeam is enough to drive away many shadows.”

—St. Francis of Assisi

Image of a sunbeam coming through a tree

Image from Unsplash by Darren Bockman

Who are the people in your world that light up your life?

Take a minute or more to make a list of these special people, and note the qualities and characteristics they exhibit that caused you to put them on your list.

On the flip side, note the individuals in your personal and professional communities that cast shadows over your world and reduce your aliveness and life satisfaction. What are their specific behaviors and attitudes that cloud your world?

EXERCISE:

Beyond spending far more time with the first group and less with the second, how can and will you personally bring more sunshine to those around you, for the benefit of all?

This effort will almost certainly attract many more sunbeams from others who also desire brighter days.

Friday Review of Posts on Accountability

FRIDAY REVIEW: ACCOUNTABILITY

How do you hold yourself and others accountable? Here are a few accountability-related posts you may have missed. Click the links to read the full messages.

 

“Don’t ever stray away from yourself to get closer to someone else.”

 

 

 

“You cannot talk your way out of something you behaved yourself into.”

 

 

 

“Quarrels would not last long if the fault were only on one side.”

 

 

 

Sit loosely in the saddle

“Sit loosely in the saddle.”

—Robert Louis Stevenson, 19th Century Scottish Novelist

Image of a galloping horse and rider

Image from Unsplash by Sergiu Vălenaș

Have you ever ridden a horse? If so, what was it like if you were walking, trotting, or at a full gallop?

Given our fast paced lives, most of us operate at a full gallop. Sitting tightly in our life saddles can be brutal, as if we were riding a rodeo bull.

If you were to seek horse-riding coaching, you would learn that you’re never really sitting at a gallop. You’re more or less standing, and letting the saddle come up and caress your rear end. Your legs get a significant workout as you use them as shock absorbers.

EXERCISE:

What strategies can you use to relax and pull yourself up from the bumpy aspects of life?

Where can you shift from a gallop to a trot, or a more scenic stroll, to enjoy a smoother, more enjoyable ride?

Muddy water let stand will clear

“Muddy water let stand will clear.”

—Tao Te Ching, Classic Chinese Text

Image of feet jumping in muddy water

Image from Unsplash by Roopak Ravi

Is your mind muddy?

To what degree are your thoughts, emotions, and feelings stirred up by the rapid, moving waters of daily events?

At such times, it seems impossible to see even inches ahead, and we often can feel paralyzed or lost.

Today’s quote – a Chinese proverb – suggests we can all find greater clarity by slowing down and letting those muddy issues blocking our view settle out, so we can once again move forward.

Over the past two years I have instituted the daily practice of a 10-minute meditation, using an app called CALM. This resource continues to get better with additional tools, including their popular sleep stories to clear and settle one’s mind at bedtime.

EXERCISE:

Check out CALM at the website or at the app store. Please consider replying to this post with the mind-clearing strategies that work best for you.

The mind is like the stomach

“The mind is like the stomach. It is not how much you put into it that counts, but how much it digests.”

Albert J. Nock, 20th Century American Libertarian Author

image of a panda eating bamboo leaves

Image from Unsplash by Debbie Molle

Did you know that a panda’s daily diet consists almost entirely of the leaves, stems, and shoots of various bamboo species? Bamboo contains very little nutritional value so pandas must eat 12-38 kilograms – that is, 26-83 pounds – every day to meet their energy needs. With this volume pandas can spend up to 14 hours a day eating.

What are you feeding your mind each day? How much nutrient-rich super foods for your mind do you ingest and digest? Alternatively, how much junk food – including forms of media – are coming your way, creating malnutrition of the mind?

EXERCISE:

Given the phrase “you are what you eat,” how can and will you be a far better dietician / nutritionist for your mind to lead a healthier, more optimal life?

Listen or your tongue will keep you deaf

“Listen or your tongue will keep you deaf.”

—Cree Nation Proverb

Image of a man's profile, with the sunset behind him

Image from Unsplash by Ashton Bingham

How many ways are there to take in information about the world? Probably first on your list would be the capacity to hear. Take a minute to examine all your other senses to notice how they allow you to fully take in what is happening around you.

Considerable research has been done to demonstrate enhanced perception of the other senses when working without the capacity to hear.

Many of us experience a form of temporary deafness throughout our day in both our personal and professional communities. The act of speaking, and perhaps talking too often or too much, actually diminishes our capacity to hear and fully listen to the ideas and contributions of others.

Consider another wise saying: When you’re doing all the talking you’re not learning anything. (Amy Castro, Performance Communication expert)

EXERCISE:

Where and with whom would a quiet tongue and a far more open set of ears provide the greatest benefit?

Consider sharing this intention to listen more full with at least one key person in your life.