“When we are no longer able to change a situation, we are challenged to change ourselves.”

“When we are no longer able to change a situation, we are challenged to change ourselves.”

– Victor Frankl, Austrian psychologist and Holocaust survivor

509Image from Flickr by MMcDonough.

This has been a particularly challenging week for a number of my clients, colleagues, friends and even family members. Unfortunately many of the situations they found themselves in were out of their control.

To quote Ari Weizweig, the CEO of Zingerman’s, we’re not always living on “planet fair”. Feeling the upset, and acknowledging it, is a key first step to experiencing freedom from anger that could continue to poison our perceptions, attitudes and relationships.

Assuming the responsibility to change yourself in such situations means you are going to move forward and work toward a positive value-centered future as quickly as possible.

Exercise:

Acknowledge at least one upsetting event in your personal or professional life where you are not able to change the situation.

Determine how you will change your perception, attitude or behavior and regain the freedom to move confidently forward in your life.

“Negative people need drama like oxygen. Stay positive, it’ll take their breath away.”

“Negative people need drama like oxygen. Stay positive, it’ll take their breath away.”

– Tony Gaskins, American life/relationships coach

508Image from Flickr by GYLo.

I’ve been reading a book on leadership by Ari Weinzweig. The chapter I just finished was on the importance of energy management and how critical it is for both individuals’ and organizations’ productivity and success.

Negative people and the drama they create (or perpetuate) literally sucks the energy and life out of an organization. In the quote above, Gaskins is suggesting that by monitoring the amount of drama and negativity and boosting our positivity, we can extinguish their destructive forces.

Exercise:

How can you notice, eliminate or at least diminish the negative people in your world, to take away their breath and extinguish their destructive energy-draining capacities?

What optimistic and energy-boosting people and resources can you use to infuse your organization or community with the fun, engagement and productivity you desire?

“Never lose an opportunity of seeing anything that is beautiful. Welcome it in every face, in every sky, in every flower.”

“Never lose an opportunity of seeing anything that is beautiful. Welcome it in every face, in every sky, in every flower.”

– Ralph Waldo Emerson, American writer and philosopher

507Image from Flickr by Parvin

We are a couple of weeks into spring and with daylight savings time here in North America, the hours of sunshine and even the temperatures are headed in the right direction. Just this week, I’ve noticed a broader smile on the faces of many of my clients as they walk in the door.

Emerson knew that beauty from virtually any source has a transformative power that can add a special and very noticeable boost to each and every day.

Exercise:

Imagine that the windshield of your car, the lenses of your glasses (if you wear them) and even the lenses of your eyes enhance your ability to see beauty by 100%.

Consider capturing this awareness in a journal, or even in your smartphone by taking a photograph.

Sometime this week, bring a bit more beauty into your physical world, at home or at work, to enjoy the boost it provides.

“If you want to keep your memories, you first have to live them.”

“If you want to keep your memories, you first have to live them.”

– Bob Dylan, American singer-songwriter

506Image from Flickr by shutterhacks.

Over the years, one of my strategies to get to know others better and deepen relationships has been to take a sincere interest in their interests.

One method I’ve used to get to know my daughter Rachel is to read books she has enjoyed. Among these are:

1. The Greatest Salesman in the World, by Og Mandino (http://www.amazon.com/Greatest-Salesman-World-Og-Mandino-ebook/dp/B004G8PIQ8)

2. Take the Stairs, by Rory Vaden (http://www.amazon.com/Take-Stairs-Steps-Achieving-Success/dp/0399537767)

3. A Million Miles in a Thousand Years, by Don Miller (http://www.amazon.com/Million-Miles-Thousand-Years-Learned/dp/1400202981)

The last one made a particular impression on me, in that its focus was on a life well lived and the fantastic memories that can accompany it.

Exercise:

Consider picking up a copy of A Million Miles in a Thousand Years for yourself and turn up your “memory meter” of life.

Consider reading books and exploring other forms of shared experiences with those you care about to take this memory-sharing and memory-developing journey together.

“The best way out is always through.”

“The best way out is always through.”

– Robert Frost, American poet

505Image from Flickr by Erik Cleves Kristensen.

Someone once told me that when you’re going through hell, keep going!

Who doesn’t have their daily personal and professional challenges? Many people seek the support of a coach to deal with such matters in a more effective and efficient manner so that they experience greater fulfillment, satisfaction and joy.

Frost is suggesting here that rather than avoiding or escaping our difficulties, we work through them to get to the other side.

Exercise:

Consider using my three-step coaching technique, the pivot point exercise, to work through at least one of your front-burner issues or challenges.

You can find it on The Quotable Coach site here: www.thequotablecoach.com/action/theres-always-some-further-action-to-take

Feel free to reply to this message and let me know how things work out.

“You’ll never know when a moment and a few sincere words can have an impact on a life.”

“You’ll never know when a moment and a few sincere words can have an impact on a life.”

– Zig Ziglar, best-selling author and motivational speaker

504Image from Flickr by Benson Kua.

A few weeks ago, I received a nice note from a woman named Tammy, providing the quote above. Other loyal subscribers have been kind enough to take a few “moments” of their day to acknowledge the impact these quotes are having in their personal and professional lives.

These comments give me a great boost to continue my efforts to make them available, having now reached the milestone of my 500th post.

Exercise:

Please take this moment to share The Quotable Coach or another resource you value with others in your world who could benefit. Hopefully you too will reap the personal satisfaction of this pay-it-forward strategy.

“The most powerful weapon on earth is the human soul on fire.”

“The most powerful weapon on earth is the human soul on fire.”

– Ferdinand Foch, French soldier and writer

503Image from Flickr by mattewvenn.

When I first read this quote, I wanted to dismiss it immediately. I’m a pretty peaceful person and I’m not a fan of weapons. So with some editorial privilege I’ve given myself, I’d like to change the word “weapon” to “force” or even “resource”.

One of the most attractive things about being a coach is that I get to express and tap into the passionate fires within myself and others and help mobilize them in the world to produce positive personal and professional results.

Exercise:

How can you add an extra log or two to your flame (and others’ flames) to have them burn even brighter?

“It is not what you do for your children but what you have taught them to do for themselves that will make them successful human beings.”

“It is not what you do for your children but what you have taught them to do for themselves that will make them successful human beings.”

– Ann Landers, pen name used by Ruth Crowley and Eppie Lederer for the “Ask Ann Landers” column

502Image from Flickr by EWULibraries.

Consider for a moment that effective parenting is like coaching. Instead of simply pouring ourselves into our children or our clients, we take an inside-out approach to help them discover the wisdom within – and thus help them discover who they truly are. Lessons learned in this manner seem to have a far greater influence and impact.

Just five minutes ago, I received a call from my daughter Rachel, who was finishing her workday serving her clients at 9.30pm on a Friday night. Listening to her go the extra mile to serve others was a very satisfying moment for me as a proud dad.

Exercise:

How can you use your coaching skills to bring out the best in your children, colleagues, friends and even clients?

“Words empty as the wind are best left unsaid.”

“Words empty as the wind are best left unsaid.”

– Homer, Greek poet

501Image from Flickr by goldberg.

To say that we live in an over-communicated world is an understatement. Homer, who lived around the eight century BC, is suggesting through this quote that some words are full of value while others are empty and worthless.

If you had to literally pay the people you met and spoke with today for the value of what they shared, what would that value be? Take a moment to go over some of these interactions in your mind to assess their worth. Which were of least or even negative value, and would have been better left unsaid?

Exercise:

Consider your own communication with others in your world. How often are you sharing pearls of wisdom and value – and how often should your inner thoughts be left unsaid? Imagine the impact on the world if everyone did this.

The 500th Quote From The Quotable Coach – Enjoy and Share!

“People give one another things that can’t be gift-wrapped.”

– Nadine Gordimer, South African novelist

500Image from Flickr by kelly.sikkema

Today marks a landmark on The Quotable Coach’s journey. The adventure began two years ago and today we’ve reached the milestone of our 500th post. (We couldn’t find a cake with 500 candles though!)

We’ve only scratched the surface of the nuggets of wisdom that have been given to us by so many insightful and remarkable people of the past and present.

Exercise:

If some of the best things in life are not things, what gifts do you have to give to others in your life?

Please consider sharing the gift of The Quotable Coach series as one option.

With sincerest thanks,

Barry Demp